1A

Weekdays at 9am

1A from WAMU and NPR is a new show for a changing America. Every day, host Joshua Johnson convenes a conversation about the most important issues of our time.

The show takes a deep and unflinching look at America, bringing context and insight to stories unfolding across the country and the world.

With a name inspired by the 1st amendment, 1A explores important issues such as policy, politics, technology, and what connects us across the fissures that divide the country. The program also delves into pop culture, sports, and humor.

1A’s goal is to act as a national mirror—taking time to help America look at itself and to ask what it wants to be. 1A is produced at WAMU 88.5, and distributed by NPR.

the1a.org: Find out more about what you heard on a recent program here.

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Oct 20, 2017

There was a lot of confusion — perhaps even more than usual — about the state of health care this week. After President Trump signed an executive order and said he’d eliminate Affordable Care Act cost-sharing payments that help low-income recipients pay out-of-pocket expenses, the subsidies seemed to be temporarily reinstated. But then … confusion.

Friday News Roundup - International

Oct 20, 2017

Stories of fights against militants dominated international news this week:

The Book That Changed The Borders

Oct 19, 2017

Gloria Anzaldúa never let borders stop her. In fact, she expanded our understanding of what physical and cultural borders meant. A literary queer Chicana scholar, poet and author, Anzaldúa wrote about her life growing up near the South Texas border, the beauty and perils it offered.

Her best-known book, “Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza,” is a seminal text that explores the invisible borders between people.

Is Free Speech In A 'State Of Emergency'?

Oct 19, 2017

White nationalist Richard Spencer plans to speak at the University of Florida in Gainesville on Thursday. In response, Florida Governor Rick Scott declared a state of emergency.

Where Do We Come From?

Oct 18, 2017

If you want to answer the most existential of existential questions, don’t look at the historical record, look in a microscope.

The study of DNA has become so advanced in recent years “that it was transformed into a historical source,” writes geneticist Adam Rutherford. This has upended our understanding of human history and evolution.

The Deal With Drug Czars

Oct 18, 2017

The role of drug czar took the spotlight this week when Trump administration nominee Rep. Tom Marino, R-Pa.,

withdrew his name from consideration for the position.

Forty years ago, an economics professor in Bangladesh launched what has often been called a revolution. His idea of making small loans available for people who otherwise couldn’t access credit — in this case, mostly poor rural women — caught on internationally.

Using this microcredit model, millions of people in Bangladesh and around the world have started small businesses, and the professor, Muhammad Yunus, was awarded a Nobel Peace Prize in 2006 for his efforts to alleviate poverty.

Today Is The Day To End Poverty (Literally)

Oct 17, 2017

October 17 is the United Nations’ International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

Nearly 11 percent of the world’s population lives on less than two dollars a day, according to the World Bank. And that’s an improvement. The World Bank says more than a billion people have moved out of poverty since 1990.

We ask what worked for that billion, and what would it take to improve the outlook for the world’s poorest people.

GUESTS

Piece By Piece: The End Of Obamacare

Oct 17, 2017

There’s a better way to offer health insurance to Americans, according to the president.

After the accusations against film industry executive Harvey Weinstein came to light, many more women and men have shared their stories of how sexual harassment and assault have impacted their lives.

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