All Things Considered

Weekdays, starting at 3 p.m.

In-depth reporting that transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. 

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f68fe1c8dd9edd9257ec|5187f681e1c8dd9edd9257be

Pages

Afghanistan
5:20 pm
Sat May 31, 2014

Who Won The War In Afghanistan? Perhaps No One

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

The release of the Sgt. Bergdahl neatly capped off a week in which President Obama laid out the plan for the end of the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan. At the end of this year, just under 10,000 troops will remain in a support role. By the end of 2016, they'll also be gone. The president did not declare victory. He just said that it was time to turn the page. So in the end, who won?

HASSAN ABBAS: I guess no one, but we'll not know for the next five to ten years, I would guess.

Read more
Technology
4:04 pm
Sat May 31, 2014

Is There A Driverless Car In Your Future?

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 5:20 pm

Earlier this week, Google debuted a fully functional driverless car — one built without a steering wheel or brake pedals. NPR's Arun Rath talks with Brad Templeton, who's advised Google on its car program, about what a future without drivers might look like.

U.S.
4:04 pm
Sat May 31, 2014

Catching Up: What The VA Secretary's Resignation Means

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 5:20 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
Business
4:04 pm
Sat May 31, 2014

Searching For Something New And Different? Here Are Products To Watch

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 6:20 pm

Quixey, a search engine for apps, hopes to challenge Google's place as King of the Internet Search. Ozy.com's Carlos Watson discusses that service and why you should keep an eye on Black & Sexy TV.

Media
6:53 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

An Old-Fashioned Newspaperman Takes The Helm In A Digital World

The Times is making headlines for more than just its change in leadership; an internal review, which leaked to the press earlier this month, was intensely critical about how the newspaper has adapted to the digital era.
AP

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 3:49 pm

The New York Times' new executive editor, Dean Baquet, took over just two weeks ago, yet he appears perfectly comfortable in his perch atop the worlds of journalism and New York. He smokes fine cigars to relax, wears elegant loafers and excuses his decision to keep his suit coat on during our conversation by saying that's just who he is.

But Baquet's identity is wrapped up in a city and a different reality more than 1,000 miles away.

Read more
Politics
4:17 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

In Mississippi, A Senate Race Derailed By A Blogger's Photos

Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran, who is seeking his seventh term, is in a heated primary race with a Tea Party-backed challenger. Supporters of his opponent are accused of conspiring to photograph Cochran's bedridden wife.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:12 pm

Mississippi's Republican Senate primary has taken a bizarre and nasty turn as Tuesday's election draws near. The heated race is considered one of the Tea Party's best opportunities to unseat a longtime GOP incumbent, U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:05 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

In Nod To History, A Crumbling Philly Row House Gets A Funeral

Historian Patrick Grossi stops in front of 3711 Melon St. during a walking tour through Mantua. On Saturday, this house will be torn down — and will receive an elaborate memorial service.
Emma Lee WHYY

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

This weekend, an old, dilapidated row house will be torn down in Philadelphia. That's not unusual — it happens all the time in Philly's blighted neighborhoods.

But this house is getting an elaborate memorial service, complete with a eulogy, a church choir and a community procession. It's called "Funeral for a Home," and local artists and historians are using the event as a way to honor the changing history of the neighborhood.

An Old, Ugly Building, Ready To Fall

Read more
Humans
4:04 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

What's In A Grunt — Or A Sigh, Or A Sob? Depends On Where You Hear It

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR news this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Hear a laugh, you know someone's happy. Hear a sob, you know someone is sad. Or are they? It's been thought that no matter where you live in the world, people express emotions using the same repertoire of sounds. But NPR's social science correspondent, Shankar Vedantam, reports on new research on how emotions are expressed and understood around the globe.

Read more
Culture
3:47 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Ralph Ellison: No Longer The 'Invisible Man' 100 Years After His Birth

Ralph Ellison in 1957, four years after his novel Invisible Man won the National Book Award. Ellison died in 1994.
James Whitmore The Life Picture Collection/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

A monument outside 730 Riverside Drive in Harlem, N.Y. — writer Ralph Ellison's longtime home — commemorates his life and his work. The marker, and many biographical sources, list his birth date as being 1914. But in fact, he was born a year earlier.

Still, events in Oklahoma City — his birthplace — and New York City, where he spent most of his life, are celebrating the centennial of his birth this year.

Read more
Movies
3:16 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

With Possible Theme Park, 'Hunger Games' May Live Beyond Final Film

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

The movie studio Lionsgate is exploring the possibility of a theme park based on The Hunger Games films and books. To test the idea's viability, the company announced that it will launch a Hunger Games exhibition at museums around the country next summer.

Pages