All Things Considered

Weekdays, starting at 3 p.m.

In-depth reporting that transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. 

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Music
4:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

In The Studio With Rodrigo Y Gabriela

Rodrigo Y Gabriela's latest album is 9 Dead Alive.
Tina Korhonen Courtesy of the artist

A pair of former heavy metal guitarists who left Mexico for Ireland, Rodrigo y Gabriela developed an acoustic sound that has taken the duo from playing on the streets for change to some of the biggest stages on the festival circuit. Rodrigo Sanchez and Gabriela Quintero joined NPR's Arun Rath in the studio at NPR West to perform a few selections from their latest album, 9 Dead Alive. Hear the music, and their conversation, at the audio link.

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Around the Nation
4:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Despite Objections, Maine Governor Acts On Food Stamp Fraud

Gov. Paul LePage is using his executive power to push through new photo ID requirements on on Electronic Benefit Transfer cards.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

To combat welfare and food stamp fraud, states across the nation are considering various steps, including requiring photos on Electronic Benefit Transfer cards. Massachusetts and New York are the only states with photo ID programs right now, but they'll soon be joined by Maine, whose Republican governor is using his executive authority to avoid a political battle and start a similar program.

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Europe
4:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Eastern Ukraine Muddles Through Voting On Referendums

Separatists in the eastern Ukraine regions of Donetsk and Luhansk asked voters to take part in an unauthorized referendum Sunday on whether to make their region independent.

Sports
5:40 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Athletes Chased By Technology In The Sport Of Anti-Doping

Lance Armstrong (left) and Tyler Hamilton compete in the 90th Tour de France in 2003. Hamilton later testified in the doping case brought against Armstrong and the U.S. Postal cycling team.
Franck Fife AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 6:59 pm

As the Giro d'Italia bicycle race sets off in Ireland this weekend, the shadow of doping will not be far behind. In a competition to beat the cheaters, scientists are constantly trying to improve drug testing.

While it can be hard for regulators to keep up with new habits, when an athlete is finally caught doping, the result can be revolutionary.

Performance-enhancing drugs have plagued the sport of cycling for years, with Lance Armstrong at the center of the scandal. But he was not alone.

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Music Interviews
4:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Atmosphere's Seventh Album: Representing 'Southsiders'

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 8:03 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

When the hip-hop dual Atmosphere got their start back in the mid-'90s, mainstream rap was dominated by a harder, aggressive sound, think Dr. Dre or Notorious B-I-G. By contrast, with their spare production and tight, introspective lyrics, Atmosphere was something different.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Asia
4:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Conflicts Over Resources With China's Neighbors Have Deeper Motives

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 5:33 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Middle East
4:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

The View From Homs: Watching The Withdrawal Of Syria's Rebels

On Friday, the Syrian government evacuated the last of the rebel fighters from Homs, following a cease-fire agreement. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Nabih Bulos, a special correspondent for the Los Angeles Times.

History
4:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Descendants Of Chinese Laborers Reclaim Railroad's History

A group of Asian-Americans, including descendants of Chinese railroad workers, recreated an iconic photo on the 145th anniversary of the first transcontinental railroad's completion at Promontory Summit, Utah.
Courtesy of Corky Lee

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 8:55 pm

East finally met West 145 years ago on America's first transcontinental railroad.

The symbolic hammering of a golden spike at Promontory Summit, Utah, completed the connection between the country's two coasts and shortened a cross-country trip of more than six months down to a week.

Much of the building was done by thousands of laborers brought in from China, but their faces were left out of photographs taken on that momentous day.

Over the years, one photograph in particular from May 10, 1869, has taken root in U.S. history.

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My Big Break
4:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Dolphins, Pirates And David Hasselhoff: Breaking Into TV At Sea

While translating for Japanese tourists on a boat in Hawaii, Leah Warshawski learned about the ocean, knowledge she later used in film production.
Courtesy of Leah Warshawski

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Director and producer Leah Warshawski's big break happened on the water.

It started when she was in college studying Japanese in Hawaii. Her dormmate worked on a boat and asked if Warshawksi wanted a job translating for Japanese tourists.

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Education
5:08 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Under Restructured Rules, Kansas Teachers Lose Tenure

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 7:45 pm

Kansas lawmakers have passed a bill to make it easier to fire teachers. The legislation will take away some of the employment protections offered to teachers. Supporters say school administrators need the flexibility to remove teachers who aren't performing, but as Kansas Public Radio's Stephen Koranda reports, teachers argue this will allow them to be fired for unfair reasons.

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