Bayou Garden

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From selecting the right plants to proper watering techniques and dealing with pests, host Dan Gill delivers the information you need to garden successfully in Louisiana's unique climate.

Dan Gill/LSU AgCenter

The blooms of a Japanese Magnolia are one of the most uplifting sights to see in winter. A blooming Japanese Magnolia is a horticultural groundhog, indicating winter is just about done for the year.

More often than not, when Japanese Magnolias bloom around town, it's fairly safe to say we are well on our way to springtime.

Prepare your beds

Feb 18, 2018
LSU AgCenter

When it comes to preparing beds for flowers, vegetables, or shrubs, you must do it properly to ensure success.

Before planting, do a thorough job of removing any weeds that may have grown in the bed. If it's a new bed, remove any existing turf. Be sure to be thorough about this as well. Turn the soil to a depth of eight inches and then spread a two to four inch layer of organic matter, such as compost, over the turned soil. Organic matter loosens the soil and helps with drainage.


LSU AgCenter

Horticulturists at LSU AgCenter's Hammond Research Station are on the hunt to rediscover underused landscape plants that have performance potential in Louisiana.

This new program is called "Plants With Potential." A core component of the program is offering plants that can be propagated with no restrictions. Increasing numbers of newly-developed varieties on the market carry invention patents, which can be costly to wholesale growers.

Itea Virginica, Henry's Garnet
LSU AgCenter

Gardeners have become more environmentally conscious over the past few decades. They're employing more environmentally sound principles in the landscape, such as using less pesticide, composting more, and even installing rain gardens.

Plant pallettes have also changed slightly for gardeners, incorporating into the landscape more pollinator friendly plants as well as native species.

Your Brown Winter Lawn

Jan 28, 2018
LSU AgCenter

By now, the snow has completely thawed and I'll suspect your lawn is a little bit browner now. Don't worry. There's no reason to be distressed about your dormant lawn; it's supposed to be like that. The lawn is just dormant. But now is a good time to plan your strategy for your nice green lawn in summer.

Adam Vos

The beginning of a new year is a great time for all of us to perform a year-end review, of sorts. This holds true for gardeners. Before the chaos of spring comes, right now, in a quiet gardening season, is the perfect time to pull out your gardening journal from last year and look into the past to remember what happened in your garden.

LSU AgCenter

Planting spring flowering bulbs now is critical for proper growth and development later on in spring. This applies to bulbs like tupis and hyacinths.

Dan Gill / LSU AgCenter

For a full year, trees work diligently pulling nutrients from deep in the soil to develop the year's foliage. But all too often, gardeners rake these leaves only to bag them and put them at the side of the road. These bags of brown gold then get taken to the landfill to serve no other purpose.

Yard clippings and other compostable materials comprise 28% of the material thrown into landfills in the U.S. This is an alarming amount of material that could otherwise be composted. Using fallen leaves in the garden is one of the easiest and cheapest solutions gardeners can employ in their own hard.

Dan Gill / LSU AgCenter

Fall is an outstanding time to plant many of the hearty culinary herbs, including parsley. Parsley is part of the same family as dill, cilantro, fennel, and celery, which can all be planted this time of year.

Allen Owings / LSU AgCenter

When azaleas are in full bloom early spring, you might think they're the most spectacular shrubs that could be incorporated into the garden. These charming shrubs are all the craze for two to three weeks of the year. Yet if an azalea planting is suggested during any of the other 50 weeks, many people scoff at the mention of a plant that is only green for the vast majority of the year.

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