Bayou Garden

Saturdays at 7:35am and 9:35am

From selecting the right plants to proper watering techniques and dealing with pests, host Dan Gill delivers the information you need to garden successfully in Louisiana's unique climate.

LSU AgCenter

The high temps with us from May through October their toll on the vegetable garden. Tomatoes, for instance, will set fewer fruit once it gets hot. Snap beans will produce poor quality beans.

On the other hand, for some vegetables, the hotter the weather, the more they like it! These hot season vegetables are ideal to plant in May and June.


LSU AgCenter

Grown and used in cuisines around the world, basil is indispensable to Louisiana cooks as well.

Besides making food taste great, basil is really easy to grow and happens to be an attractive plant. Not only is basil a great addition to the herb garden, but with the numerous shapes, leaf colors, and attractive flowers, it makes a welcome addition to any garden.


LSU AgCenter

Mulching is an easy-to-do, labor-saving gardening technique that all gardeners should take advantage of.

A mulch is a material, usually organic, that we use to cover the soil surface around plants. Mulching beds is an important part of sustainable landscaping.

Organic mulches, such as leaves, pine straw, ground pine bark, dried grass clippings, cypress mulch, and newspaper, are all derived from once-living materials. They also add beneficial organic matter to the soil as they decompose.


LSU AgCenter

The Evolution Salvia is a cultivar of Mealycup Sage and it's been named a Louisiana Super Plant selection for spring of 2016.

It comes in two colors. Mealycup Sage is a native wildflower of Texas and it's well adapted to long hot summer weather. Evolution Salvia was chosen as a Super Plant selection because of the intense color of its flower spikes as well as excellent performance in trials at the Hammond research station.


LSU AgCenter

Some of the most popular vegetables planted in home vegetable gardens belong to the cucumber family. Members of this family are called cucurbits. Many from this family can be planted this month, including summer squash, winter squash, mirliton, pumpkin, gourd, gugutka, watermelon, cantaloupe, cushaw, luffa, and, of course, cucumber.

All of these vegetables produce vines that crawl along the ground or climb. Summer squash is the exception as the vines are more bush-like.

One thing to remember is that both sexes of flowers grow on the same plant, so you don't need multiple plants.

Avoid using insecticides on your flowers in the morning, which is when your pollinators will be most active.


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