Bayou Garden

Saturdays at 7:35am and 9:35am

From selecting the right plants to proper watering techniques and dealing with pests, host Dan Gill delivers the information you need to garden successfully in Louisiana's unique climate.

Allen Owings / LSU AgCenter

The fig tree was imported into the United States some time during the 16th century. It grows well in the south Atlantic and Gulf coast areas. Figs are one of the most interesting fruits you can grow in your back yard.

The fig was one of the first fruits cultivated by ancient people. Evidence shows it's been in cultivation since 4,000 BC.

LSU AgCenter

One plant that continues to hold my interest season to season is the native Virginia Willow. As gardeners have become more environmentally conscious, they're employing more environmentally sound principles in the landscape.

Don Ferrin / LSU AgCenter

Have you looked around your lawn recently? Have you noticed yellow or brown patches that are beginning to spread and get larger?

If so you may have a disease in your lawn called take-all root rot. It's caused by a soil-borne fungus which is typically found around turf grass roots.

The Louisiana Master Gardener Program is an ongoing volunteer platform offered by the LSU AgCenter. It's not a one-off volunteer opportunity like you might find so much in the community. The Louisiana Master Gardener Program is an ongoing education and volunteering arrangement open to those with a passion for horticulture and gardening.

The main focus of the program is volunteering in the arena of home horticulture education. No prior experience with gardening is necessary to becoming a master gardener. There is a job available for every skill-set.

Dan Gill / LSU AgCenter

If you're interested in planting wildflowers in your garden, one of the best plants to put in the garden this time of the year is the native Louisiana iris.

Hybrids of this native species bloom in a rainbow of color with large, showy flowers on their long stems. While their beauty and reliability in the garden have made Louisiana irises increasingly popular around the world, they still have some obscurity in their own native Louisiana.

Mark Claesgens / LSU AgCenter

It's time to wake up and plant the roses. Roses are one of the most common gardening shrubs used throughout the world.

The Chinese have been growing these and breeding them for over five thousand years. This breeding practice has led to many, many new cultivars, interesting colors, flower habits, and shrub sizes and forms.

LSU AgCenter

You might be wondering about your tropicals right about now. Tender tropical plants were significantly affected by this winter's cold temperatures.

Sago palms took a beating this year and the AgCenter has been receiving a lot of questions about them. You want to prune off any fronds that have cold damage. The plant will be fine without them. The trunks have enough sugars in them to make sure the palm can leaf out this spring.

Dan Gill/LSU AgCenter

The blooms of a Japanese Magnolia are one of the most uplifting sights to see in winter. A blooming Japanese Magnolia is a horticultural groundhog, indicating winter is just about done for the year.

More often than not, when Japanese Magnolias bloom around town, it's fairly safe to say we are well on our way to springtime.

Prepare your beds

Feb 18, 2018
LSU AgCenter

When it comes to preparing beds for flowers, vegetables, or shrubs, you must do it properly to ensure success.

Before planting, do a thorough job of removing any weeds that may have grown in the bed. If it's a new bed, remove any existing turf. Be sure to be thorough about this as well. Turn the soil to a depth of eight inches and then spread a two to four inch layer of organic matter, such as compost, over the turned soil. Organic matter loosens the soil and helps with drainage.


LSU AgCenter

Horticulturists at LSU AgCenter's Hammond Research Station are on the hunt to rediscover underused landscape plants that have performance potential in Louisiana.

This new program is called "Plants With Potential." A core component of the program is offering plants that can be propagated with no restrictions. Increasing numbers of newly-developed varieties on the market carry invention patents, which can be costly to wholesale growers.

Pages