Bayou Garden

Saturdays at 7:35am and 9:35am

From selecting the right plants to proper watering techniques and dealing with pests, host Dan Gill delivers the information you need to garden successfully in Louisiana's unique climate.

Gardening for birds

Sep 2, 2017
LSU AgCenter/Dan Gill

When you're gardening to attract wildlife like, birds, butterflies, and other insects, you need to think about what considerations might attract these creatures to your landscape.

To attract birds, you want to provide the precise type of water, food, and cover that will make them feel at home in your garden.


LSU AgCenter

When it comes to annual transplants, the month of September gives us a planting break. We're in a period during which it's too hot plant cool season annuals and won't be hot long enough to plant summer annuals.

The weather is much too humid and oppresive for cool season annuals to live for any period of time right now. Planting them now will yield you a plant that will hang on for a few weeks and essentially melt.


LSU AgCenter

You may have noticed webs being formed around the tips of the branches of pecan and sweet gum trees. You may have also noticed defoliation under the webbing on these trees.

This most likely indicates infestation of the fall webworm. In the south, the fall webworm uses deciduous hardwood trees and some evergreen trees as a host.


LSU AgCenter

Companion planting in gardening and agriculture is the planting of a second crop within the primary crop for purposes of pest control or pollination.

The second crop can also provide a habitat for beneficial insects, maximize use of space, or in some other way help increase the primary crop's productivity.


LSU AgCenter

Horticulturists at LSUAgCenter's Hammond Research Station are on the hunt to rediscover underused landscape plants that have performance potential in Louisiana.

This program is called "Plants with Potential."

A core component of the program is offering plants that can be propogated without restrictions. Many newly-developed varieties on the market carry invention patents, which can be costly to wholesale growers.


LSU AgCenter

Composting has benefits to the garden, gadener, and the environment. The number one benefit of composting is in the pocketbook. Here are some tips to getting started with your composting.

Make sure the bin is large enough to make the heat that is necessary to break down the material rapidly and to kill off weed seeds. One cubic yard is the magic size for compost bins. Sometimes with a new hobby, common wisdom says to start small. That's not the case with composting; bigger is better.


LSU AgCenter

Everyone loves to garden when the weather is perfect, but the summer sets apart the hardcore pros from the novices. There is still plenty to do in the gardens in late July.

Tasks you can do for your vegetable garden in July include harvesting, planting, planning, and amending the soil for late fall and early winter vegetables.


LSU AgCenter

Here in southern Louisiana, high winds are a real concern. Now that hurricane season is here, it's time to look at your trees. Trees with problems can be a liability during storms.

First, check with trees with large dead branches or that are fully dead. Dead branches should be pruned. Dead trees should be removed from the property entirely.

Look at your tree's overall condition. A tree that is sickly, low in vigor, and shows sigificant signs of rot and decay in the trunk may need to be removed.


Iris in a rain garden.
LSU AgCenter

Here in Baton Rouge, we have received a teremendous amount of rainfall these past few weeks. You could consider it excessive. But, technically, how much is excessive rainfall and how should it be dealt with?

Frequent rainfall over very long extended period of time, such as one and a half inches of rain every other day for twenty days, could be considered excessive. To the contrary, one single heavy rain event, say five inches in one day, would not be considered excessive rainfall.


LSU AgCenter

Mid-summer marks the time when we need to begin scouting for insects in the lawn.

Two below-ground insects that can pose a problem to lawns in the summer are grubs and mole crickets. Above ground insects to watch for include chinch bugs and the sod web worm.


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