Bayou Garden

Saturdays at 7:35am and 9:35am

From selecting the right plants to proper watering techniques and dealing with pests, host Dan Gill delivers the information you need to garden successfully in Louisiana's unique climate.

A banana plant growing in Baton Rouge's Spanish Town.
Matthew Levine / Flickr

So far, this has been a relatively mild winter, as a result many of the tropical plants in our landscape get really big by July.


Bat guano fertilizer.
Chiot's Run / Flickr

Plants get essential nutrients from the soil, but if they're in short supply fertilizer is the supplement.


Yellow azalea leaves.
Dendroica cerulea / Flickr

Yellow leaves and leaf drops are a rather ambiguous symptom in plants. A range of problems and normal cycles cause it. 


A shovel in the ground.
Ville Misaki / Flickr

Now's the time to do it. The cool winter months are the best to plant trees.


Let Sleeping Lawns Lie

Feb 2, 2013
green.thumbs / Flickr

Lawns are still dormant now, so don't judge them too harshly. But you can tend to areas where grass has died out completely.


A rose after the rain in Boutte, La.
praline3001 / Flickr

Likely, there's no better loved flower than the rose. If you're thinking of planting some, now is a great time to do it.


A slug snacking.
Christine Majul / Flickr

The rain brings out the snails and slugs. Dan Gill explains how to trap them in your garden.


LSU AgCenter

While you're singing, "Rain, Rain, Go Away," your plants are too.


What Plants Eat

Jan 5, 2013
The scientific process of photosynthesis.
At09kg / Wikimedia Commons

It's not soil or fertilizer that sustains plants, it's sunlight.


A Christmas cactus in bloom.
Bill Kuffrey / Flickr

After the holidays, poinsettias and Christmas cactuses can still have life.


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