Bayou Garden

Saturdays at 7:35am and 9:35am

From selecting the right plants to proper watering techniques and dealing with pests, host Dan Gill delivers the information you need to garden successfully in Louisiana's unique climate.

LSU AgCenter

Home vegetable gardening has become increasingly popular over past few years. We often see an increase in vegetable gardening when we have an economic downturn like the one we recently got through

Tomatoes remain the most popular of all the vegetables we grow in our gardens. And this makes a lot of sense seeing how tomatoes form an important part of Louisiana cooking and cuisine.

Vine-ripened, home-grown tomatoes have a quality to them that makes them far better than tomatoes you might find in a supermarket.

Preventing nematodes

Sep 16, 2016
LSU AgCenter

You may sometimes read or hear about planting certain plants around other plants to prevent insect problems. This is called companion planting.

The idea is certain plants will give off aromas that will repel insects. Unfortunately, research doesn't substantiate claims around companion planting.

LSU AgCenter

Few sights are more thrilling in the garden than to see rapidly moving hummingbirds darting among the flowers.

So favored are the jewel-colored birds, feeders are put up to entice them into the landscape. Even better are gardens full of plants to provide the birds gardens full of nectar that they crave.

Creating a garden with plants specifically chosen to attract and feed these birds isn't difficult at all.


LSU AgCenter

In addition to the flooding damage done to our homes, landscapes have also been impacted. Flooding primarily impacts landscape plants by saturating the soil.

Plant roots obtain the oxygen they need from the air spaces in the soil. When these spaces are filled with water for an extended period, the roots are deprived of the oxygen they need and they may drown.


LSU AgCenter

Oppressive heat and humidity are a part of the late summer here in south Louisiana-- as much as good food and music are a part of our local culture. Despite the heat, gardening continues for those who can stand it.

Flower beds may not be looking their best right now. Our long growing season and abundance of insect and disease problems generally makes it unreasonable to expect all bedding plants to hold up from May through October.


Fertilize in August

Jul 23, 2016
LSU AgCenter

As we move into August, gardeners need to focus on two important aspects of landscape maintenance. That's fertilizing and pruning.

August is the latest that we fertilize lawns, hearty shrubs, and ground covers. Now is the time to think about what you might want to fertilize and when you want to get it done as we get into August.


LSU AgCenter

I don't know about you, but when it's this hot, I'm much less likely to spend a lot of time outside. Perfect time to focus on the plants growing indoors.

Indoor plants have requirements that must be met, and the most important one here is light. If you can't grow a plant where there isn't enough light, just don't grow it there.


LSU AgCenter

The high temps with us from May through October their toll on the vegetable garden. Tomatoes, for instance, will set fewer fruit once it gets hot. Snap beans will produce poor quality beans.

On the other hand, for some vegetables, the hotter the weather, the more they like it! These hot season vegetables are ideal to plant in May and June.


LSU AgCenter

Grown and used in cuisines around the world, basil is indispensable to Louisiana cooks as well.

Besides making food taste great, basil is really easy to grow and happens to be an attractive plant. Not only is basil a great addition to the herb garden, but with the numerous shapes, leaf colors, and attractive flowers, it makes a welcome addition to any garden.


LSU AgCenter

Mulching is an easy-to-do, labor-saving gardening technique that all gardeners should take advantage of.

A mulch is a material, usually organic, that we use to cover the soil surface around plants. Mulching beds is an important part of sustainable landscaping.

Organic mulches, such as leaves, pine straw, ground pine bark, dried grass clippings, cypress mulch, and newspaper, are all derived from once-living materials. They also add beneficial organic matter to the soil as they decompose.


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