Capitol Access

Weekdays at the bottom of the hour during Morning Edition

Reports on Louisiana politics, government and the people shaping state policy.

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legis.la.gov

Gov. John Bel Edwards was pleased with the results of Thursday’s Revenue Estimating Conference meeting, telling the panel, "For the first time in many years, you've actually upgraded our forecast for current year and for next year. Let’s just hope we’re accurate on that."

courtesy: CPRA

"“This is going to be the most money we’ve spent, right?" asked state Senator Norby Chabert of Houma.

"Yes, sir," CPRA executive director Mike Ellis replied, with a smile.

"The most money spent, in the history of this state, on construction," Chabert added, for emphasis.

"You are correct," Ellis confirmed.

wrkf.org

When a galvanizing company tried to slip a questionable ITEP application past the state Board of Commerce and Industry Tuesday, they didn’t count on Robert Adley going all "Dirty Harry" on them.

Sue Lincoln

When three members of the Capitol Press Corps’ best gathered for a panel discussion at the Council for a Better Louisiana’s annual meeting, they tried to answer one of state government’s most burning questions: What’s going to happen with the fiscal cliff?

Sue Lincoln

What's wrong with Congress?

"It's become the blame game," says former U.S. Senator John Breaux.

When he joined former congressmen Billy Tauzin and Rodney Alexander at the Council for a Better Louisiana's annual luncheon Thursday, they discussed the differences in D.C., then and now.

sos.la.gov

The Louisiana Advisory Committee to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission held a day-long hearing at the state Capitol Tuesday.

Compelling testimony came from Jhacona Williams, an LSU doctoral candidate in economics. Williams has done a statistical analysis of the statewide distribution of polling places and voting machines.

William J. Metcalf, Jr., via wikimedia commons

"It is a function of the Legislature to review agencies from time to time, to determine whether they should continue or not," House and Governmental Affairs Committee chairman Mike Danahay explained Tuesday.

With 12 "sunset reviews" (as they're called) due to be completed by next July 1, the committee is getting a jumpstart on the process, beginning with the Department of State.

Sue Lincoln

How far is it from a cop accepting a free cup of coffee to billing the state for six figures in questionable overtime? Not as far as you might think.

Accepting a little bit can always lead to accepting a little bit more," State Police Superintendent Col. Kevin Reeves admitted Monday, when speaking to the Baton Rouge Press Club.

Mark Carroll

"What we are tasked with accomplishing is to create a system for over 600 felony offenses," explains former U.S. Attorney Kenneth Polite, who is chairing the state's Felony Class System Task Force.

The group is looking to categorize offenses as A, B, C, D types, etc., generally based on current sentence ranges delineated in Louisiana law. Polite admits it's not easy to untangle the issues.

legis.la.gov

TOPS Task Force members arrived for Thursday’s meeting to find massive books of data before them.

"You asked us to look at the implications of the biggest buckets of changes that have been proposed in TOPS," Dr. Sujuan Boutte, director of the Louisiana Office of Student Financial Assistance explained, with a rueful chuckle.

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