Capitol Access

Weekdays at the bottom of the hour during Morning Edition

Reports on Louisiana politics, government and the people shaping state policy.

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The Legislative Auditor says there are some inventory problems with the LSU Health Care Services Division. 

sthelena.net

Merry Christmas Eve!

Have you ever wished you could peek in on the holiday celebrations of politicians? Today you can. Governor-elect John Bel Edwards was kind enough to share his family’s plans for this very special Christmas.

“We’re going to stay home this year and enjoy Christmas at our house.”

Edwards says that means this year they will be doing many things that have become family traditions.

“We always go to mass on the afternoon of Christmas Eve, and so we will do that at St. Helena Catholic Church in Amite – probably at the five o’clock mass.”

Wallis Watkins

Today is the day 13-year-old John Miller Edwards gets his most pressing questions answered.

“We’re having lunch and we’re taking the kids so that they can all meet,” Governor-elect John Bel Edwards says of his son’s number one request made the night he was elected.

The Jindal family is hosting the Edwards family for a meal and a tour of the entire Governor’s Mansion today.

“We’re looking forward to seeing the residence portion of the Mansion for the first time,” Edwards says, with a grin.

S. Lincoln

State lawmakers and gubernatorial candidates talked a lot about solar energy credits this past year, and now the Louisiana Public Service Commission is wrangling with solar energy issues of its own.

“Should people who have solar power on their homes, when they produce electricity and they maybe produce more than they need, should they be able to sell that at full retail price?” Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell sums up the current controversy.

S. Lincoln

Louisiana is not totally strapped for cash – yet. But the state’s capital outlay escrow account is dwindling rapidly.

“We are spending approximately $40-45 million dollars a month. That’s what we call our burn rate,” State Treasurer John Kennedy told the Joint Budget committee Thursday. “We could continue to go for a few more months, but we don’t want to hit the bottom of the bucket.”

Kennedy assured lawmakers this is a fairly regular occurrence, and said normally the state would issue general obligation bonds to refill the account, but…
“These are not normal times.”

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