Morning Edition

Weekdays starting at 5 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne, David Greene and Steve Inskeep -- along with Ann Marie Awad in WRKF's studio -- bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve, David and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f690e1c8dd9edd9257f7|5187f681e1c8dd9edd9257be

Pages

Around the Nation
6:18 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Colorado Ethics Watch To Get To The Bottom of Free Pot

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:13 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Hawaiian Company Adds Spam Flavored Macadamia Nuts

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Spam brings two things to mind: unwanted email or that gelatinous pre-cooked meat product you find at the store. Well, some people would rather see both in the trash. But many people like eating Spam and now there's a new way to do it. The Hamakua Macadamia Nut Company has a new flavor: Spam. The flavoring is meat free. Good news for any Spam-loving vegetarians who might be out there. The president of the Hawaii company, Richard Schnitzler, said Spam has a cult following in his state.

Around the Nation
3:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Texas Couple Props Up Head Start While Government Is Closed

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And a similar offer of money has propped up some Head Start programs. Laura and John Arnold, of Houston, Texas, pledged up to $10 million to keep the program running in six states.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Head Start is a preschool program for kids from low-income families. And on Friday, it closed down in many places when the government partially stopped. This is how the parent of a Head Start child, Laura Bastion, heard the news.

Read more
National Security
3:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Foundation To Pay Military Death Benefits During Shutdown

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Thursday, this is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The remains of four American service members were returned yesterday to Dover Air Force Base. They were killed in Afghanistan.

Read more
Politics
3:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

10 Days Into Shutdown, 'We've Got To Do Better Than This'

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, the partial shutdown prompted angry debate across the country. But at the center of that debate, we found quiet yesterday. We dropped by a Senate office building where the halls were empty. Papers taped on doors read: We regret that due to the government shutdown our office is closed. *

Read more
Planet Money
2:00 am
Thu October 10, 2013

What A U.S. Default Would Mean For Pensions, China And Social Security

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:38 am

What would happen if Congress doesn't raise the debt ceiling and the U.S. defaults on its debt later this month? The broad economic implications are unpredictable, but a default could cause huge trouble for the global economy.

But whatever happens to the global economy, one thing is clear: People all over the world who have loaned the U.S. government money won't get paid on time.

Read more
Arts & Life
1:58 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: On Heroism

Daily Beast Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown
Victoria Will The Daily Beast

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Tina Brown, editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast, joins NPR's Steve Inskeep again for a recurring feature Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth. This month her suggestions are all about heroes — whether being heroic means doing something, or not doing something.

Revisiting Black Hawk Down

Read more
Environment
1:56 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Whatever Happened To The Deal To Save The Everglades?

Mechanical harvesters cut sugar cane on U.S. Sugar Corp. land in Clewiston, Fla., in 2008, the same year the state struck a deal to buy most of the company's Everglades holdings.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 10:49 am

South of Florida's Lake Okeechobee, hundreds of thousands of acres of sugar cane thrive in the heart of one of the world's largest wetlands. The Everglades stretches from the tip of the peninsula to central Florida, north of Lake Okeechobee.

"The Everglades actually begins at Shingle Creek, outside of Orlando," says Jonathan Ullman of the Sierra Club.

That's nearly 200 miles north of the agricultural land that Ullman and other environmentalists say is crucial to state and federal efforts to restore the wetlands area to a healthy ecosystem.

Read more
Culture
11:03 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Mala Rodriguez And The Women Of Latin Hip-Hop

Mala Rodriguez on stage at the Mulafest Festival in Madrid in June.
Pedro Armestre AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:52 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Why Scientists Held Back Details On A Unique Botulinum Toxin

The botulism toxin comes from Clostridium botulinum bacteria, seen here in a colorized micrograph.
James Cavallini Science Source

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 2:51 pm

Scientists have discovered the first new form of botulinum toxin in over 40 years, but they're taking the unusual step of keeping key details about it secret.

That's because botulinum toxin is one of the most poisonous substances known. It causes botulism, and the newly identified form of it can't be neutralized by any available treatment.

Read more

Pages