Morning Edition

Weekdays starting at 5 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne, David Greene and Steve Inskeep -- along with Ann Marie Awad in WRKF's studio -- bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve, David and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Tina Brown's Must-Reads
2:39 am
Tue January 22, 2013

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: Hidden Lives

Longtime CIA agent and counterintelligence agent Jeanne Vertefeuille, pictured at center, was instrumental in uncovering undercover agents, or moles, within the organization in the 1980s and '90s.
Central Intelligence Agency

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 9:06 am

Tina Brown, editor-in-chief of Newsweek and The Daily Beast, occasionally joins Morning Edition to talk about what she's been reading for a feature we call "Word of Mouth." This month, she recommends a trio of stories on people who've led hidden and often extraordinary lives — a businesswoman and technological giant who started life in Chinese re-education camps, a billionaire investor and education reformer whose personal experiences are too big for a series of ghostwriters, and a CIA agent whose job was to find a story among piles of forgotten documents.

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Shots - Health News
2:37 am
Tue January 22, 2013

'Roe V. Wade' Turns 40, But Abortion Debate Is Even Older

While the U.S. Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision of Jan. 22, 1973, is usually considered the start of the abortion debate, the move to relax state abortion laws began with medical and law professionals in the 1960s. Here, Eunice Kennedy Shriver and doctors from Johns Hopkins University and the Harvard Divinity School announce the International Conference on Abortion on Aug. 9, 1967.
Bob Daugherty AP

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 2:57 pm

Jan. 22, 2013, marks the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

But the conventional wisdom that the court's 7-2 decision marked the beginning of a contentious battle that still rages today is not the case, according to those on both sides of the dispute.

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NPR Story
9:01 am
Mon January 21, 2013

A Look At Memorable Moments From Past Inaugurations

Originally published on Mon January 21, 2013 10:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Well, from the studio, I'm going to go out again to talk to NPR's Linda Wertheimer. She is at a place that has a very good view of the activities there on the Mall. That happens to be the Canadian embassy. And just one thing: the West Front of the Capitol is decorated in red, white and blue. That is the backdrop for President Obama's second Inauguration. And Linda has seen every Inauguration since the second time President Richard Nixon was sworn into office, his second inaugural. Good morning.

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NPR Story
9:01 am
Mon January 21, 2013

Inauguration Day: Update From The Capitol And Mall

Originally published on Mon January 21, 2013 10:40 am

Staten Island's PS22 student choral group performs as people file onto the National Mall hoping for a glimpse of President Obama later.

NPR Story
9:01 am
Mon January 21, 2013

Inauguration Day: Update On Foreign Policy, Defense

Originally published on Mon January 21, 2013 10:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGE, HOST:

And let's rejoin Steve, now, over at the Capitol.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Yeah. And let's bring one more voice into the conversation, here. Michele Flournoy is a former undersecretary of defense for policy in the Obama administration, was mentioned at one time as a possible secretary of defense in a second term. Ms. Flournoy, where are you this morning?

MICHELE FLOURNOY: We are on our way from Bethesda, downtown.

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NPR Story
8:24 am
Mon January 21, 2013

Smaller Crowds At Capitol, But 2009's Enthusiasm Persists

Originally published on Mon January 21, 2013 9:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Steve, thanks very much. Now let's go just beyond the capital building, into the National Mall. That's where NPR's Ailsa Chang is. And she's between the Capitol, as I understand it, Ailsa, and the Washington Monument, right there in the thick of things.

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NPR Story
8:21 am
Mon January 21, 2013

Inauguration Day: Update From The Capitol

Originally published on Mon January 21, 2013 10:01 am

NPR hosts and correspondents check in at the Capitol as Inauguration Day festivities get under way.

Around the Nation
6:45 am
Mon January 21, 2013

Inaugural Parade Begins At The Pentagon Moves To D.C.

Originally published on Mon January 21, 2013 9:01 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. One of the liveliest parts of today's events dates back to the very first Inauguration, and that would be the inaugural parade. After George Washington took his oath of office, he was joined by a procession made up of local militias as he made his way from Mount Vernon to New York City. Today, the parade is a colorful blend of marching bands, floats and different organizations led by ceremonial military regiments.

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Around the Nation
6:36 am
Mon January 21, 2013

NASA's 'Mohawk Guy' To March In Inaugural Parade

Originally published on Mon January 21, 2013 9:01 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The inaugural parade will have floats and marching bands, and for science geeks a special treat - life-size replicas of the NASA Mars rover, Curiosity, and the Orion space capsule. The biggest attraction may be marching alongside the replicas: Bobak Ferdowsi, the go-to guy for last year's Mars landing, who came to be known as Mohawk Guy. He told Wired magazine he'll reveal a special new hairstyle just for today's parade. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Politics
6:28 am
Mon January 21, 2013

Is Joe Biden Eying A Run For The Presidency?

Originally published on Mon January 21, 2013 9:01 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Vice President Joe Biden first ran for president in the 1980s, an up and coming young pol who was knocked out of the race. He tried again in 2008 before becoming President Obama's running mate. Now, he starts another term still number two. But at a weekend inaugural event, he declared, I'm proud to be president of the United States. His son corrected him, though one persistent question is whether the vice president may try one more run in 2016.

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