birth control

A string of Republican candidates for Senate are supporting an issue usually associated with Democrats: easier access to contraception.

Women have choices in contraception, from pills and injections to intrauterine devices and the NuvaRing. But when women discuss birth control with their doctors, they may not be getting all the information they want, a survey finds.

Abortions in the U.S. resumed their downward trend between 2008 and 2011, according to a new study. But its authors say the recent surge of state laws intended to restrict the procedure is likely not the reason.

What will it take to make intrauterine devices sexy?

IUDs are highly effective forms of contraception, but fear of side effects, lack of training for doctors and costs can keep women away. Health organizations and private companies are trying to change that by breaking down misconceptions and broadening access.

The contraceptives are inserted into the uterus and can prevent pregnancy for years. And they're reversible. Shortly after they're taken out, a woman can become pregnant.

Activist Faye Williams and political strategist Scott Wilfong discuss the school massacre in Connecticut and renewed calls for stronger gun controls. They also discuss the removal of Susan Rice for consideration as Secretary of State, and Gov. Jindal's recent call for over-the-counter contraceptives.


In a Wall Street Journal opinion column, Gov. Bobby Jindal says birth control pills should be available over-the-counter.  

If women were allowed to get birth control without a prescription, Jindal argues, employers with moral objections would not have to pay for it and Democrats could no longer accuse Republicans of being against contraception.