2016 presidential election

W.Watkins

Much of the 2015 Louisiana political news was dominated by the guy who used to tell us, “I’ve got the job that I want,” as well as by those vying to take over that job.

Governor Bobby Jindal began the final year of his administration with a controversial prayer rally at LSU, where he declared, “We can’t just elect a candidate to fix what ails our country. We need a spiritual revival to fix what ails our country.”

But the rally was no fix for the state’s massive budget deficit. Neither was Jindal’s stance, based on his pledge to Grover Norquist.

S. Lincoln

Just when you thought it was safe not to mute the ads on TV, here we go again.

Qualifying for Louisiana’s March 5th presidential preference primary concludes today, with eight Democrats and thirteen Republicans signed up to compete thus far.

The eight Democrats include former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders.

Wallis Watkins

“This is not my time.”

With those words, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal has ended his quest for the White House, a campaign that began with a rally in Kenner on June 24th.

“My name is Bobby Jindal,” he declared then, to cheers from the crowd. “I am governor of the great state of Louisiana, and I am running for President of the greatest country in the world—the United States of America!”

Last evening, Jindal’s announcement was much quieter, given during a one-on-one with Bret Baier on Fox News.

S. Lincoln

Governor Bobby Jindal is speaking at the Value Voters Summit in Washington, D.C., today. The event is put on by the Family Research Council, headed by former Baton Rouge state representative Tony Perkins. We can make an educated guess that he’ll talk about religious liberty, as he often has lately.

“The biggest discrimination going on is against Christian business owners and individuals who believe in traditional forms of marriage,” Jindal said during the CNN debate last week.

He’ll also likely urge, “Defund Planned Parenthood right now,” as he did during an appearance on a talk radio program in Iowa this week.

During that same conversation, Jindal suggested getting rid of Congress.

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It’s one of Governor Jindal’s favorite statistics, and one he’s sure to quote in tomorrow night’s debate on CNN: “We’ve actually cut our state budget 26 percent.”

Yet every time Bobby Jindal says it, State Treasurer John Kennedy cringes.

“It does bother me when the Governor says that,” Kennedy states. “It offends me because those aren’t the numbers.”

In fact, Kennedy says, the actual numbers show the opposite.

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