Bill Cassidy

Sue Lincoln

The second week of the session brought a kaleidoscope of activity to the Capitol, as color co-ordinated citizen activist groups and students sporting blue, yellow, red, green and/or purple  rallied on the steps and then cornered their lawmakers urging votes for equal pay, criminal justice reform, and mostly for more funding.


Senator Bill Cassidy held the first of five Louisiana town hall meetings Tuesday night in Livingston Parish. As WWNO’s Jessica Rosgaard reports, the audience of about 300 people asked questions about flood recovery and the policies of the Trump administration.

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Louisiana’s congressional delegation is speaking up on President Donald Trump’s travel ban. 


In response to President Donald Trump's recent executive order, which places travel bans on people from seven countries in the Middle East, Louisiana’s congressional delegates (U.S. Senators and U.S. Representatives) have commented.

Louisiana’s second flood recovery funding request has fallen short on Capitol Hill.

Legislation currently under consideration in Congress will fund the federal government through the end of April. It includes $1.4 billion in flood relief for Louisiana.

With a battle cry of “Repeal Obamacare”, Republicans took control of the U.S. Senate earlier this month. Wrangling in Washington over when—or if—to actually act on that campaign promise is part of the backdrop to Louisiana’s Senate runoff.


Two bills that would authorize building the controversial Keystone XL pipeline will soon come to a vote in Congress, as their sponsors — Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., and Rep. Bill Cassidy, R-La. — head toward a runoff election next month to decide who will win the Senate race.

NPR's Debbie Elliott reports:

"On the Senate floor, Landrieu called for action on the Canada-to-Texas pipeline project, saying, 'I believe with a push we could actually get the votes that we need to pass the Keystone pipeline.'

Much as expected, Rep. Bill Cassidy and Sen. Mary Landrieu were the top finishers in a field of eight, and will be squaring off in a Dec. 6 runoff election.

“We have 32 more days. This is not over yet,” said a smiling, energized Cassidy to a campaign party crowd of several hundred supporters in Baton Rouge.

 With less than a week left before Election Day, the leading candidates for U.S. Senate unloaded their verbal firepower during Wednesday night’s final debate.

FULL AUDIO: The Final Louisiana Senate Debate

Oct 29, 2014
theadvocate.com

The LSU's Manship School of Mass Communication hosted a final debate Wednesday, Oct. 29, between the top three contenders in Louisiana's Senate race on Nov. 4. 


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