BRPD Police Chief Carl Dabadie

BRPD, EBRPSO

At Thursday’s community memorial service for Baton Rouge’s fallen law enforcement officers – Brad Garafalo, Matt Gerald and Montrell Jackson -- Police Chief Carl Dabadie and State Police Commander Mike Edmonson  both spoke of their heroism.

“We gather here in memory of three remarkable men,” Chief Dabadie began. “Their work put them in harm’s way every day, and they chose to serve anyway.”

“They ran to a call where there was a gunman. They ran towards it,” Col. Edmonson said, with admiration. “And when their fellow man was down, they ran towards them.”

Sue Lincoln

After expressing their sorrow and condemning the killing of police officers, Together Baton Rouge made an announcement Tuesday.

“The Governor’s office and the Department of Justice have asked us – Together Baton Rouge – to give leadership to community policing,” Rev. Lee Wesley, one of the leaders of the cross-cultural interfaith organization stated.

Sue Lincoln

“Pure, unadulterated evil,” was how Governor John Bel Edwards described the killing of three law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge during a Monday press conference.

“There is no doubt whatsoever that these officers were intentionally targeted and assassinated,”

Louisiana State Police Commander Mike Edmonson stated.

He gave the media a detailed description of Sunday’s firefight between Baton Rouge  cops and deputies, and the gunman, Gavin Long – including showing photos of the multiple weapons Long brought to the attack..

Sue Lincoln

With chants of “What do we want? Justice! When do we want it? Now!”  and “Black Lives Matter!”, protest marches and rallies in the wake of the Alton Sterling shooting continued in Louisiana’s capital city Sunday.

“Right now we are hurt, enraged, and beyond ready for a change. We need to take these strong feelings and turn it into motivation,” one teen-aged speaker at a rally on the Capitol steps said, earning cheers and applause from the crowd of several thousand.

courtesy: Facebook

  For Baton Rouge patrol officers Blane Salamoni and Howie Lake II, it started with a call from dispatch.

“Have a suspicious code two. He pulled a gun on complainant and told him he couldn’t be around there,” the dispatcher advises.

Minutes later, it ended for 37-year-old Alton Sterling, with five shots fired, and witnesses screaming,“Oh, my God!”

“They shot him?”

“Yes!”

What happened in between? Baton Rouge Police Chief Carl Dabadie says we still don’t know.

Guest host Robert Travis Scott chats with new Advocate editor Peter Kovacs about taking over the daily paper and changes that are underway.

Then, a discussion of "Carmageddon" in Baton Rouge, one year ago -- the tanker accident shut down I-10 for 27 hours, locking up the capitol city. State Police Captain Taylor Moss talks about the decision to blow up the tanker and BRPD Lt. Todd Weishar discusses traffic management on that fateful day. Both examine what would happen if a similar accident occurred now.