Coastal Land Loss

Roseau Cane Update

Jan 1, 2018
visitpasadena.org / LSU AgCenter

While you oooh and ahhh over the intricate use of flowers and plants ornamenting today's Rose Parade floats in Pasadena, California, Louisiana officials continue to fret about the die off of a necessary marshland plant — Roseau cane.

 

"We've now got observations of the invasive scale in 13 parishes," reports Jim Pahl with the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority.

Lawmakers Bugged About Plants And Their Pests

Nov 9, 2017
LA DWF

Louisiana House Natural Resources Committee members are bugged by some plant problems: too much of one, and the die-off of another. The first needs more bugs to eat it; the second needs a way to kill the bugs causing it.


Coast Overflowing, But Not the Money to Fix It

Oct 17, 2017
pbs.org

“You hear the cliché that we lose a football field every hour? Well, we’ve kind of improved that a little bit,” Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority director Johnny Bradberry told the Baton Rouge Press Club Monday. “We’re losing a football field every hundred minutes – which is still a bad situation.”


Wikimedia Commons

Five coastal parishes -- Cameron Parish, Jefferson Parish, Plaquemines Parish, St. Bernard Parish and Vermillion Parish -- are suing oil and gas companies for damages to coastal land. 


From Sea to Shining Marsh

Sep 11, 2015
Nick Janzen

Down by the toe of Louisiana’s boot, Bayou Grand Liard used to be surrounded by solid land.

“I’ve talked to people whose fathers and grandfathers used to come out here and hunt rabbits. Now you see it’s all open water,” says Chuck Perrodin, a spokesman for the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority.

To fix that, the CPRA is in the middle of a marsh creation project at Bayou Grand Liard. “We’re taking what used to be land and marsh, went back into open water, now we have made it back into land,” Perrodin says.

Creating Land at the Edge of Louisiana

Aug 31, 2015
Nick Janzen

  In Bayou Grand Liard, down by the toe of Louisiana’s boot, the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority is creating marsh. Chuck Perrodin, a spokesman for CPRA, sums up what’s going on: “We’re taking what used to be land and marsh, went back into open water, and now we have made it back into land.”

Creating land where there’s open water seems like an impossible task, but the basic idea is remarkably simple—fill in the water with lots of sand. Finding that sand, and transporting it, is the hard part.