coastal wetlands

The Jim Engster Show
10:22 am
Wed March 5, 2014

WEDNESDAY: Lieutenant General Russel L. Honore

Retired Lieutenant General Russel L. Honore joins Jim in the studio to discuss a plethora of issues and topics. In his usual passionate, loud and outspoken manner, the General talks about leading the Green Army, a loose network of environmental groups which tackles environmental issues such as saltwater intrusion in the Baton Rouge aquifer, the sinkhole at Bayou Corne, coastal erosion, and wetlands preservation. He touches on Louisiana's HIV problem, the seafood industry, and "holding Louisiana politicians accountable" for what they say and do, and specifically what they don't. The General wraps up the show by chiming in on Russia's invasion of the southern Ukrainian peninsula of Crimea and  what might ensue as a result of Putin's actions.


Science & Environment
4:11 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Rate Of Coastal Wetlands Loss Has Sped Up, U.S. Study Says

Saltwater wetlands that include marshes and shoals on Virginia's Atlantic coast. U.S. coastal wetlands losses were 25 percent greater from 2004-2009, according to a recent federal study.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 6:47 pm

The U.S. lost an average of 80,000 acres of coastal wetlands from 2004 to 2009, according to the latest data published by federal agencies. More than 70 percent of the estimated loss came in the Gulf of Mexico; nationwide, most of the loss was blamed on development that incurred on freshwater wetlands.

"The losses of these vital wetlands were 25 percent greater than during the previous six years," NPR's Elizabeth Shogren reports for our Newscast unit. She also notes that the loss equals "about seven football fields every hour."

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Environment
2:38 am
Thu July 25, 2013

La. Flood Board Sues Oil Industry Over Wetlands

Canals created for navigation and oil and gas pipelines cut through the marsh off the coast of Louisiana, seen in 2010.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 10:49 am

Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost roughly as much land as makes up the state of Delaware.

"If you put the state of Delaware between New Orleans and the ocean, we wouldn't need any levees at all," says John Barry, vice president of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East. "There is this large buffer of land that has disappeared, and that buffer makes New Orleans much more vulnerable to hurricanes."

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