constitutional amendments

Rex Fortenberry

The House Civil Law Committee began working through proposed constitutional amendments Monday.

“Right now there are 50 constitutional amendments out there,” staff attorney Robert Singletary advised the members.

They weren’t debating the content of the amendments, just okaying the ballot language, in case any of those measures make it through the legislative process.

media commons

“What we constantly are hearing is ‘Our hands are tied because we have dedicated funds in the constitution’,” Baton Rouge Representative Franklin Foil reminded the House Appropriations Committee Monday.

But the question of whether to dedicate or undedicate state funds may ultimately be left to voters, as state lawmakers are moving forward with constitutional amendments proposing to tie up more money, as well as one to unlock funds that are currently off limits.


S. Lincoln

“We have six constitutional amendments that voters statewide will be making their choice on.”

With the help of Public Affairs Research Council president Robert Travis Scott, we found out about the first three amendments Friday. Today we’re getting the rundown on the remainder, beginning with Amendment Four -- a property tax exemption.

S. Lincoln

“We have six constitutional amendments that voters statewide will be making their choice on,” and Public Affairs Research Council president Robert Travis Scott says it’s important to know what those amendments do before you enter the voting booth.

Voters Say 'No' to 6 of 14 Amendments

Nov 5, 2014
Louisiana Secretary of State

On election day, Louisiana voters said yes to protecting state funding for healthcare, and a firm no to measures that would expand the size and reach of state government.


 

Candidates for office, from Constable to Senate, have been parading through the Secretary of State’s Office and the Clerk of Court Office this week, qualifying to get their names on the November ballot.

But it’s not just names that we’ll be voting on.

Robert Travis Scott, President of the Public Affairs Research Council of Louisiana, explains why we’ve got so many constitutional amendments to decide on too.

 


Jack Cox

State Sen. Dan Claitor wants to add tax rebates to the list of matters that can only be considered in odd-numbered years, when the constitution mandates lawmakers take up fiscal issues. Generally, even-numbered years are reserved for non-fiscal deliberations. The constitutional amendment would require two-thirds approval in the legislature and a vote of the people.

Tax exclusions, exemptions, deductions, credits, and refunds are already limited to fiscal years.

Ballot Amendment would Restrict Medicaid Fund Use

Nov 5, 2012

The first of nine constitutional amendments on the ballot in Louisiana would prevent the legislature from raiding the state’s Medicaid Trust Fund to balance the budget. But LSU Political Scientist Robert Hogan says it could also hamstring the budgeting process if Louisiana’s demographics shift.