CPRA

LA1coalition.org

A controversial proposal for elevating LA 1 to Port Fourchon, backed by Governor Jindal, has been drawing fire from the candidates seeking to replace him in the mansion. The plan would have used “leftover” funds from BP, unused because the coastal projects the RESTORE Act funded were completed under budget.

“I would oppose that from this source of funds,” Scott Angelle said during a forum for the governor candidates earlier this week.

But when the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority met Wednesday, chairman Chip Kline announced that a compromise had been reached – to use GOMESA money instead of BP funds.

From Sea to Shining Marsh

Sep 11, 2015
Nick Janzen

Down by the toe of Louisiana’s boot, Bayou Grand Liard used to be surrounded by solid land.

“I’ve talked to people whose fathers and grandfathers used to come out here and hunt rabbits. Now you see it’s all open water,” says Chuck Perrodin, a spokesman for the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority.

To fix that, the CPRA is in the middle of a marsh creation project at Bayou Grand Liard. “We’re taking what used to be land and marsh, went back into open water, now we have made it back into land,” Perrodin says.

Creating Land at the Edge of Louisiana

Aug 31, 2015
Nick Janzen

  In Bayou Grand Liard, down by the toe of Louisiana’s boot, the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority is creating marsh. Chuck Perrodin, a spokesman for CPRA, sums up what’s going on: “We’re taking what used to be land and marsh, went back into open water, and now we have made it back into land.”

Creating land where there’s open water seems like an impossible task, but the basic idea is remarkably simple—fill in the water with lots of sand. Finding that sand, and transporting it, is the hard part.

EPA

Louisiana’s share of the $18.7 billion BP settlement is of intense interest to the state’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority. But director Chip Kline told the board Wednesday that most details are remain under wraps.

“Some of us are still under a confidentiality agreement as this thing plays out, so there’s only so much that we can discuss,” Kline explained, by way of apologizing for not being more forthcoming.

CPRA staffer Alyson Graugnard was able to give a timeline of the next steps, now than an agreement-in-principle has been reached.

Louisiana’s congressional delegation — most notably former U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu — has fought for coastal restoration funding for years. And it’s just about to pay off big.

“In November of 2017, approximately $170-million is to be made available to the state — $140-million of which comes to the CPRA,” explains Kyle Graham, with Louisiana’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority. The source of the funds is a federal program known as GOMESA.

Pages