criminal justice reform

lsmsa.edu

The House worked long and hard Monday, passing Senate bills before the session countdown clock required shifting to a two-thirds majority vote on all items.


screenshot from legis.la.gov

Though it’s not yet a done deal, criminal justice reform is nearing the legislative finish line.


lpb.org

“There isn’t a whole lot looks like that’s going to get accomplished in this session.”

Senate President John Alario admits he’s feeling pessimistic as we head into the final nine days of this fiscal session, and what happens today may tell the tale of the session’s success or failure.


screenshot: legis.la.gov

When House Republican Caucus chair Lance Harris squared off with New Orleans Senator Karen Carter Peterson – who is the chair of the state Democratic Party, it was partisan pugilism of the verbal variety.

Harris’ bill to increase parole fees by 50% was the issue.


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There is much that divides Louisiana’s lawmakers, but when it comes to criminal justice reform and reinvestment…

“Representative Leger and I finally found something we can agree on,” Denham Springs Republican Valarie Hodges said, with a laugh.

“Love it!” New Orleans Democrat Walt Leger responded.


courtesy: Marcus Hunter

A full day of action at the Capitol Wednesday often took on the qualities of the Twilight Zone.

In the House Municipal Affairs Committee, there was Shreveport Representative Thomas Carmody’s bill to require elections in order to remove military monuments.

Sue Lincoln

So much social media and conventional media attention in the capital city has been focused on rumors about the Department of Justice release of the Alton Sterling report, late yesterday afternoon, I went to the person who requested the investigation—Governor John Bel Edwards – and asked him what he had heard about the imminent release of the report.


Wallis Watkins

In a meeting of a Senate Judiciary Committee Tuesday, Representative Terry Landry (D-New Iberia) presented Senator Dan Claitor's (R-Baton Rouge) bill to eliminate the death penalty in Louisiana. 


Sue Lincoln

The second week of the session brought a kaleidoscope of activity to the Capitol, as color co-ordinated citizen activist groups and students sporting blue, yellow, red, green and/or purple  rallied on the steps and then cornered their lawmakers urging votes for equal pay, criminal justice reform, and mostly for more funding.


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The session’s first criminal justice reform bill is headed to the Senate floor. SB 16 by Dan Claitor addresses the problem of those previously sentenced to life without parole when they were juveniles.

Louisiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Bernette Johnson explained the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that penalty unconstitutional in several cases.

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