environment

Since taking office, the Trump administration has been looking for ways to repeal the Clean Power Plan — the Obama administration's policy to reduce carbon emissions at local power plants.

LRN

Mary Lee Orr of the Louisiana Environmental Action Network talks about the state of the environment in Louisiana and the conflict over the Bayou Bridge pipeline.


LRN

Professor Nancy Rabalais of LSU's Energy, Coast and Environment Department talks about the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico and its impact on the environment.


The dead zone is an area in the Gulf of Mexico where the oxygen is so low that fish and shrimp can’t live.

 

Scientists say this year’s dead zone is 8,776 square miles now -- about the size of New Jersey. Over the last five years it’s averaged 5,543 square miles.

 

It’s caused largely by agricultural runoff from the Midwest, and brought downstream by the Mississippi River. That runoff is high in nitrates, from fertilizer, which causes algae to bloom. When the algae dies, it sucks oxygen out of the water.

Wikimedia Commons

Dan Collins is a Baton Rouge land man who has been battling the state in court over environmental violations he uncovered while working for the Department of Natural Resources. Collins talks about his whistle-blower lawsuit regarding Bayou Postillion.


Lt. Gen. Russel Honore
Restore Louisiana Now

Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré joins us for the inaugural edition of Talk Louisiana. Honoré, who was regarded as a hero in leading the recovery from Hurricane Katrina, is now leading a group of environmental activists at the State Capitol. Honoré's Green Army will be active in the upcoming legislative session, pushing environmental reform. Honoré discusses the goals of the Green Army and provides his impressions about the state and national political system.


What's the Best Way To Fix the LSU Lakes?

Oct 26, 2015
Travis Lux

The LSU lakes are sick. They’re slowly filling with harmful nutrients and sediment, without an effective way to drain.

“If we do nothing, they will become the swamps that they were,” says landscape architect Jeffrey Carbo. With funding provided by the Baton Rouge Area Foundation (BRAF), Carbo's firm, Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects, helped create the Lakes Master Plan.

Their solution is to dredge. But not everyone likes that plan.

A government-appointed group of top nutrition experts, assigned to lay the scientific groundwork for a new version of the nation's dietary guidelines, decided earlier this year to collect data on the environmental implication of different food choices.

Congress now has slapped them down.

In 2009, when the Great Recession took hold of the United States, Americans reversed a long-running trend in polling: For the first time since Gallup first asked the question in the 1980s, more Americans said they favored economic growth over protecting the environment.

Retired Lieutenant General Russel L. Honore joins Jim in the studio to discuss a plethora of issues and topics. In his usual passionate, loud and outspoken manner, the General talks about leading the Green Army, a loose network of environmental groups which tackles environmental issues such as saltwater intrusion in the Baton Rouge aquifer, the sinkhole at Bayou Corne, coastal erosion, and wetlands preservation. He touches on Louisiana's HIV problem, the seafood industry, and "holding Louisiana politicians accountable" for what they say and do, and specifically what they don't. The General wraps up the show by chiming in on Russia's invasion of the southern Ukrainian peninsula of Crimea and  what might ensue as a result of Putin's actions.


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