fiscal cliff

Leftover Money

Sep 22, 2017
Sue Lincoln

There’s good state financial news, for a change.

“Revenue is finally exceeding – slightly – the forecast.”

After Governor John Bel Edwards made that statement on his monthly radio show Wednesday, it was confirmed during Thursday’s Revenue Estimating Conference meeting.


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The approaching fiscal cliff has prompted a whole lot of meetings lately – behind closed doors.

“I’m very optimistic that we’re going to get it done, working with these business roundtable meetings and the legislative leadership in both the House and the Senate,” Governor John Bel Edwards said, following his meeting with business leaders in Bossier City last week.

In the past month, he has also met with business owners and representatives in Baton Rouge, Alexandria, Houma, and New Orleans. However, House Appropriations chairman Cameron Henry isn’t favorably impressed.

California Coastal Commission

“I see a deficit of just over $1.5-billion, correct? That's the fiscal cliff we keep talking about?” New Orleans Representative Gary Carter asked, as the latest tally of next July's fall off in state revenue was presented to the Joint Budget Committee last week.

Yet despite all the warning signs, some lawmakers don't see the drop as being all that steep.


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Having worn glasses since I was six years old, I'm very familiar with myopia, which is also known as nearsightedness. Lately it seems some lawmakers have it, too, when it comes to Louisiana's fiscal issues.


Sue Lincoln

“Come July 1, we are all tumbling off the cliff together,” Louisiana Commissioner of Administration Jay Dardenne warned the Baton Rouge Rotary Club.


TOPS Task Force Named

Aug 4, 2017
Mark Carroll

What to do about TOPS? The popular college scholarship program has grown from $50-million in 1999, to a cost of nearly $300-million this year, and Louisiana is facing a $1.2-billion drop in revenues next year.

“Doing nothing is not an option moving forward,” says Representative Franklin Foil of Baton Rouge.


Sue Lincoln

Only 344 more days till Louisiana reaches the edge of the fiscal cliff, yet most state legislators are following the “out-of-sight, out-of-mind” prescription. Not so for the administration, though, as the issue loomed large over Thursday’s State Bond Commission meeting.

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When will lawmakers be called back for the next special session to deal with the fiscal cliff?

“You know, that’s a good question,” Governor John Bel Edwards said, when asked. “And I truly don’t know.”


Failure To Act

May 31, 2017
Louisiana House of Representatives Broadcast Archives

In a legislative session where tax reform has been a key focus, the one and only comprehensive tax reform package has failed. 


lpb.org

“There isn’t a whole lot looks like that’s going to get accomplished in this session.”

Senate President John Alario admits he’s feeling pessimistic as we head into the final nine days of this fiscal session, and what happens today may tell the tale of the session’s success or failure.


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