flood insurance

Insurance Commissioner Jim Donelon on the perils of hurricane season and a large percentage of Louisiana residents without flood insurance.

LSU History Professor Alecia Long on the parallels between Huey Long and Donald Trump and their conflict with media coverage.

 

Advocate Capitol Bureau Chief Mark Ballard comments on the coming collision of wills between the House and Senate over the fiscal cliff.

 

Pictured: Alecia Long

 

 


Harvey Turns More Attention to NFIP Renewal Need

Sep 1, 2017
Kirsten Roed

Few can dispute the need for the National Flood Insurance Program, considering the devastation wrought by Harvey.

“The imperative to get it reauthorized, I think the exclamation point has been provided by Harvey, but we didn’t need Harvey to tell us how important flood insurance is,” says Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards.

And when Congress returns to work next week, Louisiana’s delegation will be leading the effort to renew NFIP, which expires September 30th.

Work on National Flood Insurance Bill Continues

Aug 2, 2017
courtesy: Louisiana State Fire Marshal

“The National Flood Insurance Program is vital to Louisiana’s economy. It expires September 30th. We need to renew it.”

Louisiana's U.S. Senator John Kennedy is an intrinsic part of that effort.


Since last August, the popularity of flood insurance has again surged in Louisiana, but the future of the debt-laden National Flood Insurance Program is uncertain. Since 2005, the program has racked up $24.6 billion in liability to the U.S. Treasury, mostly due to claims after Hurricane Katrina, Superstorm Sandy, and the Great Louisiana Flood of 2016. That’s just one way that Louisiana’s past is influencing the federal program’s future.

FEMA has taken the unprecedented step of reopening all Superstorm Sandy flood claims because thousands of homeowners said insurance companies intentionally lowballed damage estimates.

Similar allegations surfaced in 2004 after Hurricane Isabel struck the Mid-Atlantic. To answer critics then, FEMA formalized an appeals process.

That appeals process has gone against Sandy victims almost every time, statistics show.

The House is expected to vote as early as next week to partially repeal a 2012 law that overhauled the National Flood Insurance Program, which is tens of billions of dollars in debt.

The law was meant to make people living in flood-prone areas foot more of the insurance bill. But lawmakers didn't realize how many homeowners would be affected — or how hard they'd be hit.

You can find some of those homeowners in Bayou Gauche, about 30 miles west of New Orleans.

Louisiana Department of Insurance Commissioner, Jim Donelon, talks with Jim about surviving prostate cancer, the Affordable Care Act, and flood insurance, and John S. Treen joins Jim to discuss his special election run in 1989 against former Ku Klux Klansman David Duke, and about Sen. David Vitter running for governor.


Millions of American property owners get flood insurance from the federal government, and a lot of them get a hefty discount. But over the past decade, the government has paid out huge amounts of money after floods, and the flood insurance program is deeply in the red.

Congress tried to fix that in 2012 by passing a law to raise insurance premiums. Now that move has created such uproar among property owners that Congress is trying to make the law it passed disappear.

Louisiana public officials are launching a bipartisan battle to revamp proposed changes to the National Flood Insurance Program. The administrator evaluating the objections was taken on a helicopter tour of coastal regions possibly facing steep premium hikes.

ProPublica: FEMA Flood Maps Fraught with Error

Aug 8, 2013
Burnet County Environmental Services Department via ProPublica

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has issued new preliminary flood maps.

Louisiana’s delegation in Washington, D.C. is griping over FEMA’s disregard of local flood protection measures when it drew them.

Meanwhile, unless Congress succeeds in passing a delay, federal flood insurance rates are set to go up dramatically as soon as October. Many in Louisiana are facing increases of 20 percent or more.

And, as ProPublica reporter Theo Meyer has found, some may end up paying for insurance they don’t need.

Read the ProPublica article: Using Outdated Data, FEMA Is Wrongly Placing Homeowners in Flood Zones

Share your story: Tell ProPublica About Flood Map Problems Where You Live

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