Flood Recovery

Around the country, hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent to buy back individual homes from people who have flooded repeatedly. But buying out a whole neighborhood is uncommon. Louisiana's 2016 flood seems to be changing that for two communities. In Pointe Coupee and Ascension Parishes, a buyout program first used in neighborhoods after Superstorm Sandy may offer a new option to homeowners who have lived with escalating risk for decades.

Wallis Watkins

Pat Forbes, Louisiana Office of Community Development Director, updated the Legislature’s Homeland Security Committee yesterday on recovery from the 2016 floods.

“We know that recovery - disaster recovery especially for homeowners - is never fast enough. We’re 14 months after the August flood,17 months after the March flood," explains Forbes.


C-SPAN

Congress has voted to give victims of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria some tax relief as they recover from the disastrous storms. But taxpayers in Louisiana who flooded in 2016 won’t get the same assistance.


Martine Turner and Kellie Bertrand of the Louisiana Spirit Crisis Counseling Center talk about mental health issues stemming from the historic flood of 2016.


Office of Community Development Executive Director Pat Forbes talks about work remaining in the aftermath of the 2016 flood.


Traumatic experiences like major floods can have psychological ramifications. Since Hurricane Katrina, FEMA has sent money to Louisiana to provide counseling for survivors struggling with poor mental health every time a disaster hits the state.

A program called Louisiana Spirit has been providing that service to victims near Baton Rouge since the floods last August. But as the one-year anniversary approaches, the program is winding down — leaving some victims in the lurch.

Nicole Sweazy of the Louisiana Housing Authority talks about the shelter program utilitzed after the historic flood of 2016.


Flood Recovery: Not-So-Rapid Rehousing

Aug 15, 2017

Federal aid helped pay for hotels for thousands of Louisianans after last year's flood. Until May, the short-term program help people find shelter, especially low-income renters. Now a state-managed program is still filling in the gaps, trying to give more permanent homes to families washed out last year — including a single mother in Baton Rouge.

Denham Springs saw some of the worst damage in the August 2016 flood. As the rebuilding continues, the city is developing a long-term recovery plan — one designed by the people who live there. Denham Strong, the city's recovery planning group, gives residents an opportunity to advocate for what they want Denham Springs to look like years from now.

LRN

Mayor Gerard Landry of Denham Springs updates on his city's recovery from the historic flooding of 2016 one year late.

Mayor Landry says 77 percent of the structures in Denham Springs received severe flood damage. We check in with landry for the latest on the recovery in Denham Springs.


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