flooding

Lawsuits Allege Interstate 12 Exacerbated August Floods

Apr 26, 2017

In August, residents of southeast Louisiana were left stunned when water destroyed towns during a so-called 1,000 year rain. The National Weather Service said the flooding was triggered by a slow-moving, low-pressure weather system that dumped as much as two feet of rain over a matter of days. But as Della Hasselle reports, others say some of the damage could have been prevented, and that one highway in particular is to blame.

LRN

Reporter Della Hasselle touches on concerns that some of the destruction from the historic flooding of 2016 could have been prevented and that one interstate highway is to blame.


As part of our ongoing reporting on flood recovery in Louisiana, Betsy Shepherd set out to tell the story of Guidry Brangus Ranch, a family-owned cattle farm in rural Vermilion Parish. Struggling to recover after being submerged by floodwater last August, Shannon Guidry planned to sell his farm. But just a few weeks after the interview, another tragedy struck - and this agriculture recovery story took a turn that no one could have imagined.

Wallis Watkins / WWNO

Over a third of the public schools in Livingston Parish were damaged by the flooding in Southeast Louisiana last August. While some of those schools have been repaired, others still haven't been able to reopen - like Southside Junior High School, where classes began this new year at a new site - for now. 


Thousands of Louisiana flood victims are still living in hotels as part of FEMAs Temporary Shelter Assistance program.

On the list of FEMA relief options, the hotel vouchers are meant as a short-term solution -- but four months later, it's still the only option for many people who can't return home.

Community meetings are scheduled in seven parishes across Louisiana through December 20th.

Residents will have an opportunity to review proposed flood recovery programs, and talk to officials in charge of coordinating the recovery efforts.

Hosted by the Louisiana Office of Community Development, the meetings are part of a public comment period for the state’s action plan, which includes assistance programs for homeowners, renters, and small businesses.

Public meetings are scheduled as follows:

Louisiana’s second flood recovery funding request has fallen short on Capitol Hill.

Legislation currently under consideration in Congress will fund the federal government through the end of April. It includes $1.4 billion in flood relief for Louisiana.

Jesse Hardman

Back in August, just after the historic floods, Louisiana officials expressed concern that proposed federal and state disaster recovery funds might not be enough. With deadlines for flood assistance programs passed, or looming, affected residents are learning the math of getting back on their feet.


LSU AgCenter

In addition to the flooding damage done to our homes, landscapes have also been impacted. Flooding primarily impacts landscape plants by saturating the soil.

Plant roots obtain the oxygen they need from the air spaces in the soil. When these spaces are filled with water for an extended period, the roots are deprived of the oxygen they need and they may drown.


Websites and phone numbers for assistance.

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