football

Parents worry about a child getting a concussion in the heat of competition, but they also need to be thinking about what happens during practices, a study finds.

High school and college football players are more likely to suffer a concussion during practices than in a game, according a study published May 4 in JAMA Pediatrics. Here are the numbers:

  • In youth games, 54 percent of concussions happened during games.

Under the bright lights on a cold November Friday, the Panthers of River Rouge High are about to play for the district championship.

On the other side of the field, the visitors' stands are packed. The River Rouge side is pretty empty as the Panthers take the field.

The Panthers' head coach, Corey Parker, is used to this. He works it into his pregame speech.

"All we have is us!" he shouts, as his players bounce with nervous energy. "Fight for each other, love each other, let's go get it Rouge!"

As the Seattle Seahawks and New England Patriots prepare to face off at the Super Bowl on Sunday, a scandal about under-inflated footballs is still dominating headlines.

While that subject has been a trending topic on Twitter, it is just the latest in a series of controversies this season. So many recent stories about the nation's most popular sport have focused on domestic abuse and sexual assault allegations, as well as the dangerous effects of concussions and other long-term health consequences for players.

With the fall season come littered leaves, new television lineups and the sport that can't stop stirring up controversy: football.

Rough tackles and concussions worry many parents. And no wonder. Research cited by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons suggests that more than a third of college football players have had one concussion and 20 percent have had more than one.

Actor John Schneider, famous for the Dukes of Hazards and now a Louisiana resident, is our guest for today's first segment. He discusses what's is like to have a new Louisiana driver's license, his studio here in the state, and how it is he stays healthy and in shape at the age of 54.

Also, Dr. Hypolite Landry is our second guest and he joins us in studio just a day after turning 88 years old. He reminisces with Jim about setting the then world record for flying solo around the world in 1969, which he did in 13 days, 9 hours, 20 minutes. He as well remarks upon the time he had the opportunity to grace "The King's" presence and make an unexpected visit to Elvis Presley's hotel room at the Hilton Hotel in downtown Baton Rouge after The King canceled a concert. Hypolite and Jim discuss this and much more.

And last but not least, author Steve Almond talks with Jim about his latest book Against Football: One Fan's Reluctant Manifesto. In his book Steve tells of why, after forty years of being a fan, he can no longer watch the game he loves for a multitude of reasons ranging from it's treatment & depiction of women as ornaments, to the frightening probability of brain damage the players can face, and much more.


The extra point might just be the most unexciting play in football. After all, the post-touchdown, 1-point kick is successful 99.5 percent of the time — so successful that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell recently talked about eliminating it.

We're only a few Sundays shy of the big game, so here's a Super Bowl warm-up video, a "What if ... ?"

Sports marketing and management firm Fantex has reached a deal with San Francisco 49ers tight end Vernon Davis for an initial public stock offering. Fantex is paying Davis $4 million for the rights to 10 percent of his earnings, and the company is also creating a tracking stock linked specifically to the football player's economic performance. Davis is the second player to try this arrangement with Fantex. Sportswriter Fatsis joins Robert Siegel to explain how this is all supposed to work — and why he's dubious.

The NFL season is in high gear — a fact that pleases the roughly 64 percent of Americans who watch football. The season rolls on despite the now constant news about concussions in the sport.

The recent TV documentary League of Denial and the book by the same name claim that for years the NFL had denied and covered up evidence linking football and brain damage. Is the concussion conversation challenging this country's deep love for the game?

The NFL adopted a new rule this season that makes it illegal for players to hit with the crown of their helmet. In other words, ramming your head into someone.

Pages