gardening

Allen Owings / LSU AgCenter

Spring is short in Louisiana. Weather rapidly transitions from winter to summer. But if you look for it and you're aware of the signs, spring actually starts to show up in February in Louisiana, especially in the southern part of the state.

Spring lingers through late April and into May. So we actually have eight weeks of spring weather, which isn't so bad. But whichever way you look at it, May is the first month of summer in Louisianans, so now is the time to switch from spring gardening activities to summer ones.

LSU AgCenter

The foliage on your spring flowering bulbs like daffodils, tulips, and hyacinths is probably beginning to look a little ratty in your landscape by now. Late April to early May is a great time to dig these spring flowering bulbs out of the garden where it's possible.

If these bulbs happen to be growing in the lawn or close to a three or shrub, consider leaving them in the landscape to go dormant naturally. It's not worth disturbing the root systems of other plants in order to properly store these bulb.

For the best results for next year's blooms for those bulbs that you can get out of the ground, use a pitchfork instead of a shovel. With a pitchfork, you'll loosen the soil but won't sever roots or accidentally cut a bulb in half the way you might do with a shovel.

Prepare your beds

Feb 18, 2018
LSU AgCenter

When it comes to preparing beds for flowers, vegetables, or shrubs, you must do it properly to ensure success.

Before planting, do a thorough job of removing any weeds that may have grown in the bed. If it's a new bed, remove any existing turf. Be sure to be thorough about this as well. Turn the soil to a depth of eight inches and then spread a two to four inch layer of organic matter, such as compost, over the turned soil. Organic matter loosens the soil and helps with drainage.


LSU AgCenter

Horticulturists at LSU AgCenter's Hammond Research Station are on the hunt to rediscover underused landscape plants that have performance potential in Louisiana.

This new program is called "Plants With Potential." A core component of the program is offering plants that can be propagated with no restrictions. Increasing numbers of newly-developed varieties on the market carry invention patents, which can be costly to wholesale growers.

Adam Vos

The beginning of a new year is a great time for all of us to perform a year-end review, of sorts. This holds true for gardeners. Before the chaos of spring comes, right now, in a quiet gardening season, is the perfect time to pull out your gardening journal from last year and look into the past to remember what happened in your garden.

LSU AgCenter

Virginia buttonweed is one of the worst summer weeds infesting Louisiana turf grasses.

Predictions indicated this weed would become a worse-than-average problem this summer, thanks to the summer flooding last year. And the prediction was absolutely correct.


Gardening for birds

Sep 2, 2017
LSU AgCenter/Dan Gill

When you're gardening to attract wildlife like, birds, butterflies, and other insects, you need to think about what considerations might attract these creatures to your landscape.

To attract birds, you want to provide the precise type of water, food, and cover that will make them feel at home in your garden.


LSU AgCenter

When it comes to annual transplants, the month of September gives us a planting break. We're in a period during which it's too hot plant cool season annuals and won't be hot long enough to plant summer annuals.

The weather is much too humid and oppresive for cool season annuals to live for any period of time right now. Planting them now will yield you a plant that will hang on for a few weeks and essentially melt.


LSU AgCenter

Companion planting in gardening and agriculture is the planting of a second crop within the primary crop for purposes of pest control or pollination.

The second crop can also provide a habitat for beneficial insects, maximize use of space, or in some other way help increase the primary crop's productivity.


LSU AgCenter

Horticulturists at LSUAgCenter's Hammond Research Station are on the hunt to rediscover underused landscape plants that have performance potential in Louisiana.

This program is called "Plants with Potential."

A core component of the program is offering plants that can be propogated without restrictions. Many newly-developed varieties on the market carry invention patents, which can be costly to wholesale growers.


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