GOP

Elbert Gillory
elbertguillory.com

Former State Senator Elbert Guillory (R-Opelousas) and Faye Williams (D-Alexandria), President of National Congress of Black Women, discuss efforts by the Louisiana GOP to attract more Republicans. There are 22,000 black Republicans out of three million registered total voters in the state.

Also on today's program: Patrick Mulhearn on Louisiana's film industry, here.

Thomas Groome
YouTube

Thomas Groome, Professor of Religion and Theology, says Democrats are losing ground in key rust belt states, with Catholic voters moving to the GOP. He notes that President Trump won the White Catholic vote by 23 percentage points over Hillary Clinton, a group that President Bill Clinton won in each of his presidential elections of 1992 and 1996.

Professor Groome, in a recent editorial to the New York Times, urges Democrats to change the debate on abortion or risk losing more ground with Catholic voters.


Mark Carroll

While a regular legislative session is limited to 60 days, with the two special sessions added in, Louisiana’s legislature is starting its 78th day of nearly continuous lawmaking, and patience is wearing thin. Commissioner of Administration Jay Dardenne says this is not fun, but it is dysfunctional.


After the Republican presidential candidates finish their first debate this summer, many will head to Atlanta for a summit hosted by Erick Erickson, conservative activist and editor-in-chief of RedState.com.

This year, Erickson's RedState Gathering is scheduled for the same weekend as the Iowa Straw Poll.

Jeb Bush has already indicated he will go to the RedState Gathering rather than Iowa. Scott Walker, Carly Fiorina, Bobby Jindal, Marco Rubio and Rick Perry are also going. Most will try to attend both events, Erickson says.

The Republican Party made historic gains during this week's midterm elections. Among their victories were three wins by black Republicans, who seem to be building momentum for diversifying the GOP ranks.

Mia Love — who is Mormon and Haitian-American — is one of those three, and Republicans in Utah's 4th District will be sending her to Congress next year.

"Many of the naysayers out there said that Utah would never elect a black, Republican, LDS woman to Congress," Love told a crowd on Tuesday. "And guess what? Not only did we do it, we were the first to do it!"

A string of Republican candidates for Senate are supporting an issue usually associated with Democrats: easier access to contraception.

Last year, the Republican playbook for keeping control of the House of Representatives in 2014 and winning the Senate consisted of a fairly simple strategy: Run against Obamacare.

But now that the 2014 races are starting to take shape, that strategy isn't looking quite so simple. Democrats are fighting back. They're focusing on Republican opposition to the health law's expansion of Medicaid as a part of their own campaigns.

For her campaign's first TV ad, Michigan Republican Senate hopeful Terri Lynn Land is taking an unconventional approach.

She's attempting to take a familiar Democratic attack line and flip it against her male challenger.

A new video ad you can see online (or this Sunday on the Fox News Channel) features Gov. Bobby Jindal of Louisiana and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush describing what constitutes a "New Republican."

Republicans seem to have all the momentum lately when it comes to the battle for control of the U.S. Senate.

GOP chances were already looking brighter because of the drag on Democrats from the Affordable Care Act and President Obama's low approval ratings. Then came two developments that suddenly expanded the playing field: Former GOP Sen. Scott Brown recently announced his intent to run against New Hampshire Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, and GOP Rep. Cory Gardner jumped in against Colorado Democratic Sen. Mark Udall.

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