Gov. John Bel Edwards

Sue Lincoln

Governor John Bel Edwards saw some victories for his agenda in the Senate this week, with the advancement of criminal justice reforms and anti-discrimination legislation, as well as a bill to increase the minimum wage. The House, on the other hand?

“Quite frankly, I’m disappointed – particularly in the House,” the governor said, with a sigh.


Nothing Personal

May 15, 2017
Sue Lincoln

The friction between House Republican leadership and Democratic Governor John Bel Edwards is no secret. But is it just partisan politics, or is it personal? I sat down with House Appropriations Chairman Cameron Henry to try and find out.

“The governor and I get along just fine,” Henry insisted. “We went deer hunting once, duck hunting twice last season. No, personally, he and I get along just fine.”

Henry admits he has some philosophical differences with the governor when it comes to budgeting.

Sue Lincoln

So much social media and conventional media attention in the capital city has been focused on rumors about the Department of Justice release of the Alton Sterling report, late yesterday afternoon, I went to the person who requested the investigation—Governor John Bel Edwards – and asked him what he had heard about the imminent release of the report.


Timmy Teepell
LRN

Timmy Teepell is the political strategist for Former Governor Bobby Jindal. Teepell discusses the Jindal legacy and assesses the first 15 months of Governor John Bel Edwards. Teepell consults nationally for GOP candidates. He will also provide observations about the first 100 days of President Trump.


Creative Commons -Max Pixel

As is usual early in a legislative session, it’s been an abbreviated week for lawmakers.

“Let me wish each of you a very blessed Easter,” Senate President John Alario said Wednesday morning, as the upper chamber concluded its work for the week.


screen capture by Sue Lincoln

Three thwacks of the gavel called the 2017 fiscal legislative session to order Monday. And as is customary, the governor addressed the House and Senate jointly. But as Governor John Bel Edwards laid out a massive agenda -- including criminal justice reform and comprehensive tax reform -- he also warned lawmakers this would not be a business-as-usual session.


Sue Lincoln

Lawmakers gather at the Capitol for today’s start of the 2017 legislative session, and there’s a lot on the menu: a challenging budget, comprehensive tax reform, criminal justice reform, roadwork backlogs and more. Few, if any, of the options seem to be to everyone’s taste, however.


Sue Lincoln
Kelly Tate

WRKF's Sue Lincoln joins us for our Friday look at politics. This week, we examine what appears to be the loss of civility in civil discourse as illustrated by Gov. John Bel Edwards' appearance before a U.S. House Oversight Committee hearing this week. We also preview the state legislative session, which opens Monday.


screen capture from C-SPAN broadcast

“Prior to and throughout the response to the 2016 floods, FEMA was a very good partner. But the transition from response to recovery is where challenges arose,” Governor John Bel Edwards told the U.S. House Oversight Committee on Flood Recovery and Governmental Affairs. He testified Wednesday in response to complaints about the pace of the recovery from August’s devastating floods across south Louisiana.


Republican Congressmen from Louisiana have repeatedly criticized Democratic Governor John Bel Edwards' management of flood recovery. That fight continued in Washington on Wednesday, where Edwards testified before the House Government and Oversight Reform Committee

Chairman Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) -- and others -- pounded Edwards with scathing criticism for almost three hours. 

To provide more context on the hearing, WWNO's Jessica Rosgaard sat down with Molly Peterson, who has been reporting on flood recovery for the Louisiana Public Radio Partnership. 

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