Governor Bobby Jindal

Jim talks with Republican State Representative Franklin J. Foil about the upcoming legislative session and Governor Bobby Jindal's proposed tax plan.

Former MLB Pitcher Dennis Dale "Denny" McLain discusses his experience as the pitcher for the Detroit Tigers and also the upcoming MLB season.


LSU-Shreveport political science professor and blogger Jeff Sadow talks with Jim about Governor Jindal's policies and his support for the Governor.

Physicist and author Leonard Mlodinow discusses his new book, "Subliminal: How Your Subconcious Mind Rules Your Behavior"


Gov. Bobby Jindal went before the legislature Thursday to unveil his tax proposal. He wants to eliminate the income tax and says the state can make up the gap with a higher and more expansive sales tax.

The proposal would make Louisiana the state with the highest sales tax in the nation. Combined with local sales taxes, Louisianians would pay an average of 10.75 percent in sales tax. And the state would start taxing things that haven’t been taxed before – like landscaping, haircuts, and cable and Internet services.

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Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle are voicing their skepticism of Governor Bobby Jindal’s tax overhauls. The forum this morning: an annual pre-session briefing hosted by the Louisiana Association of Business and Industry.

Jim Patterson of LABI kicked off the presentation with what he’s heard from legislators about their private talks with Governor regarding his still unreleased tax overhauls. "[Gov. Jindal] does want to conform the local sales tax base to the state tax base," Patterson said. "This will help local governments to absorb what are going to be some relegation of services by the state to them.


Governor Bobby Jindal wants to eliminate the state income tax and make up for the lost revenue by increasing state sales taxes. He is seeking money to run a media campaign in support of his proposal.

But Louisianians are not likely to be asked to vote on the tax reforms until late 2014. So why lobby support from the general public now?  

WRKF’s Ashley Westerman put that question to LSU professor and director of the Manship School’s Public Policy Research Lab Kirby Goidel.


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