Gulf Coast

Politics
4:47 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Landrieu Says Revenue Sharing, Not Lawsuit, Will Benefit Coastal Renewal

Sen. Mary Landrieu spoke at the Baton Rouge Press Club Monday.
Credit Ann Marie Awad

Senator Mary Landrieu says a lawsuit against oil and gas companies is not the answer to renewing Louisiana’s gulf coast.

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Louisiana Coast
9:29 am
Wed May 15, 2013

The Louisiana Coast: Last Call — How We Got This Way: Canal Dredging

Man-made canals in the Barataria Basin wetlands.
Dr. Terry McTigue NOAA

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 2:39 pm

These days when fishing guide Ryan Lambert motors away from the boat launch in Buras, he’s fishing in the what locals call “the land of used-to-bes.”

As in, that used to be Yellow Cotton Bay, or Drake Bay, or English Bay… and dozens more. It’s all one big open body of water now because the marshes, cypress swamps and ridges that separated these water bodies for most of his life are gone.

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Gulf Coast
11:02 am
Wed November 28, 2012

Water Institute Hires Esteemed Researcher

The Water Institute of the Gulf has hired a renowned Mississippi River expert to join their staff to help advance the group’s Gulf Coast restoration and protection efforts.

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Gulf Coast
12:00 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Institute Seeks to Bridge Gap Between Research and Engineering to Save Gulf

Ehab Meselhe is the new Director of Natural Systems Modeling and Monitoring for the Water Institute of the Gulf. (WRKF/Tegan Wendland)

This week the state legislature unanimously approved the 2012 Louisiana Coastal Master Plan, a 50 year blueprint for restoring disappearing wetlands and protecting the state's natural resources.

Coastal land loss is an ongoing problem in gulf states and there are many agencies, non-profits and universities working to solve it. An independent research institute hopes to be the linchpin that brings them all together. The Water Institute of the Gulf was founded last year and has just selected UL-Lafayette civil engineering professor Ehab Meselhe as the new director of natural systems. He's also heading up a five-year, $25 million federally funded project studying land loss and restoration.

WRKF's Tegan Wendland talked with him about how he hopes the Water Institute will streamline efforts to save the gulf.


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Wildlife
12:00 am
Fri April 27, 2012

Sick Fish Suggest Lingering Impact of BP Spill

A lesion on a red snapper found in the area of the BP spill (Courtesy of James Cowan.)

In November 2011, roughly a year and a half after the Deepwater Horizon disaster, commercial fisherman began catching red snapper with dark sores and lesions in the Gulf.

A group of LSU scientists studying the impact of the disaster is still finding large numbers of sick fish -- snapper in particular -- throughout the area of the oil spill.


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