higher education

Despite being under a “state of emergency” due to Friday’s wintry weather, members of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee braved rain, sleet and snow to get their first look at Governor Bobby Jindal’s proposed budget for Fiscal Year 2015.

FRIDAY: Steven Barnett, Sandra Woodley & Max McLean

Jan 24, 2014

Jim Engster interviews Steven Barnett, Director of the National Institute for Early Education Research, Sandra Woodley, President  of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette System, and Max McLean of the theatrical production of "C.S. Lewis' The Screwtape Letters."

President Obama thinks more poor kids who are good students should be enrolled in the country's best colleges and universities. Too often, he says, kids from lower income families don't even apply to the best schools, where they might have a good chance of getting financial aid.

This week, he gathered the heads of 100 colleges and universities to a meeting at the White House to discuss how to change this situation for the better. I hope he is successful.

FRIDAY: John N. Kennedy, La. State Treasurer

Jan 17, 2014

Jim Engster speaks with John N. Kennedy, Louisiana State Treasurer, about state budget matters including his support of a plan to reduce state consulting contracts to help improve funding of higher education.


LSU's Bob Mann and author Samuel Freedman, who wrote a book about Grambling State University, discuss the state of Higher Education in Louisiana.

State Librarian Rebecca Hamilton talks about the annual Louisiana Book Festival, this weekend in Baton Rouge at the State Capitol.


This week, a federal judge found that historically black colleges in Maryland were harmed when better-funded traditionally white institutions offered up the same degree programs in the state.

Tricia Bishop of The Baltimore Sun summed up the judge's ruling this way:

Opposing opinions surfaced from state education leaders this week on whether the state should move forward on implementing national education standards called Common Core.  The ongoing struggle to fund higher education continued at a meeting of higher education officials Wednesday.

The interest rate on government-backed student loans is going to jump from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent Monday.

Republicans, Democrats and the Obama administration could not agree on a plan to keep it from happening. Lawmakers say a deal is still possible after the July 4 recess. But if they don't agree on a plan soon, 7 million students expected to take out new Stafford loans could be stuck with a much bigger bill when they start paying the money back.

It has been one of the more heated debates in Washington this year.

Monday lawmakers and lobbyists hustled across the rotunda that connects the chambers to assemble the votes to keep their bills alive, lest they fall victim to “Drop Dead Day” at the Capitol.

Sound ominous? 

The House Appropriations Committee Wednesday approved $60 million in capital spending for the state’s technical colleges over the next five years — despite the state’s tight purse-strings.

Chairman Jim Fannin insisted that investing in the technical college system will grow the economy and the tax base.

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