irrigation

LSU AgCenter

The high temperatures we're bound to encounter can take their toll on spring and early summer vegetables. Tomatoes will set fewer flowers; snap beans will produce poorer quality beans. Conversely, with some vegetables... the hotter it gets, the better they do.

Remember that mid-summer gardening is different from gardening in the spring. You'll need to remember thorough irrigation to counter the summer's long stretches of hot, dry conditions.

LSU AgCenter

It's not quite summer yet, but the days are becoming longer and hotter. Heat can be unpleasant for people and for plants. That's sepcially the case when they don't have enough to drink.

The hotter it gets, the faster the water either evaporates from the soil or is consumed and then lost by the plant. Landscapers should make sure gardens receive about one inch of water per week. That means there needs to be at least an inch of rain, an inch of irrigated water, or a combination every week.