Jan Moller

S. Lincoln

Just 3 years ago, Louisiana was crowned “the filmmaking capital of the world”, with more movies originating here than anywhere else. For the past year, though, soundstages have been empty. Over the next three days, we’ll explore the rise and fall of Hollywood South – and whether it can rise again.

S. Lincoln

With Congress back from its summer recess, Governor John Bel Edwards was in Washington Thursday, pressing for more federal flood recovery funding.

As we look ahead to deciding on the next governor of Louisiana, we’ve been also looking back, taking a cue from Huey Long, known for the “Share our Wealth” plan under the motto, “Every Man a King”.

Jan Moller with the Louisiana Budget Project points out that every issue that plagues the state – and the reason we end up on the bottom of so many “good” lists – can be traced back to Louisiana’s ranking as the third poorest state in the nation.

Sue Lincoln

While campaign songs may be “so last century”, many of the same issues that prompted Huey Long to pen “Every Man a King” still plague Louisiana more than 80 years later. A line in the song says, “There’s enough for all people to share,” yet Louisiana’s on-going budget problems contradict that sentiment. For the men who would be king -- the candidates for governor – the state’s budget problems dwarf everything else.

“The budget is going to be the first, second and third topics for the next governor to deal with,” Louisiana Budget Project director Jan Moller says, noting last year’s budget, the current budget, and next year’s budget are all in the red.

 Since it’s an election year, it’s highly unlikely that lawmakers will risk the wrath of voters or the governor by raising taxes to fill Louisiana’s $1.6-billion budget hole. But they will almost certainly be taking a hard look at state tax breaks to bridge the budget gap.