Jimmy Leblanc

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The session’s first criminal justice reform bill is headed to the Senate floor. SB 16 by Dan Claitor addresses the problem of those previously sentenced to life without parole when they were juveniles.

Louisiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Bernette Johnson explained the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that penalty unconstitutional in several cases.

Sue Lincoln

Burl Cain may be gone as Angola’s warden, but he’s far from forgotten, as the Legislative Audit Advisory Council looked into allegations of wrongdoing.


Sue Lincoln

“We have done the most comprehensive study of Louisiana’s criminal justice system in the history of our state,” Corrections Secretary Jimmy Leblanc said, as the Justice Reinvestment Task Force presented its final report, including 27 recommendations aimed at reducing Louisiana’s “world’s highest” incarceration rate.


Mark Carroll

What does the “world’s highest incarceration rate” really mean?

“It feels oftentimes that as DAs and judges we are flipping hamburgers because the volume that we have,” says East Baton Rouge District Attorney Hillar Moore.

It also means that more than 5 out of every 10-thousand residents are in jail, at a cost of $600-million per year. And it means Louisiana desperately needs major criminal justice reform.

Sue Lincoln

The Louisiana Association of Business and Industry convened a summit Thursday to start tackling one of the state’s less desirable statistics.


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Usually “We’re Number One” is something to brag about, but in this case, it’s not a stellar statistic.

“The United States leads the world in the number of people we incarcerate, and Louisiana leads the country. We are number one in the nation in the number of people we lock up,” Louisiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Bernette Johnson advised the legislature recently.

But what does that mean, in overall numbers?

Wallis Watkins

Even before he’s sworn in as governor at noon today, John Bel Edwards is having to defend some of his leadership staff selections, beginning with the re-appointment of Col. Mike Edmonson as Superintendent of Louisiana State Police.

Erstwhile supporters of Edwards took to social media to question the choice as soon as it was announced, while reporters asked Edwards if he’d been pressured by the Sheriff’s Association.

“Colonel Edmonson enjoys the support of local law enforcement across the state, not just the Sheriff’s Association but the Chiefs of Police,” Edwards responded. “And the executive directors of both of those entities did reach out to me and express their confidence in him and their desire that he continue to serve in this capacity.”