jobs

courtesy: LSU AgCenter

“Our state economy is growing, but those benefits are not accruing to workers.”

That’s the conclusion of the 3rd biennial report on “The State of Working Louisiana”, issued by the Louisiana Budget Project Thursday. 

allianceswla.org

Whether it’s refundable tax credits, a decade's worth of property tax forgiveness, or cash up front, Louisiana is making deals with industry. In fact, state Economic Development Secretary Don Pierson has a new video out about it.


npr.org

The latest state employment figures are out, and the song remains the same one we’ve heard before from legislative fiscal analyst Greg Albrecht.

“We’ve been in a real decline, while the rest of the country has not. What we really need is job growth.”

Louisiana’s 5.7% unemployment rate, compared to the national average of 4.3%, is impacting sales tax and personal income tax collections, which together make up 61% of total state revenue.

Sue Lincoln

The state’s Revenue Estimating Conference met Thursday, to officially acknowledge the shortfall for the fiscal year that ended July 1st.

“The bottom line: $315.5 million less in General Fund direct revenue collected, relative to expectation or forecast for FY 16,” Legislative fiscal analyst Greg Albrecht announced.

Pushing forward in his Presidential campaign, Governor Bobby Jindal is touting the number of jobs created under his leadership. "In Louisiana," he says, "we’ve got $60 billion of projects coming into our state, over 90,000 jobs." 


Insight: Baton Rouge 'Beyond Shovel Ready'

May 16, 2014

 

The Brookings Institution's latest analysis of metro economic data, "The Extent and Impact of U.S. Infrastructure jobs," focuses on infrastructure employment for the first time.

The Baton Rouge area is ranked 15th nationally for the share of overall employment made up by infrastructure jobs. 


Tom Perez is having fun at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. He sits in a Corvette, climbs into a new pickup truck, and gamely poses for pictures next to a $140,000 Dodge Viper.

"Any federal employee who's driving a Dodge Viper either has a really good spouse, a really good inheritance or needs to be investigated by the inspector general," he jokes.

Part of a series about small businesses in America

When it comes to job creation, politicians talk about small businesses as the engines of the U.S. economy. It's been a familiar refrain among politicians from both major parties for years.

But it obscures the economic reality. It makes a nice slogan, but it's not really accurate to say that small businesses produce most of the nation's new jobs, says John Haltiwanger, an economics professor at the University of Maryland.