Lance Harris

Sue Lincoln

Governor John Bel Edwards saw some victories for his agenda in the Senate this week, with the advancement of criminal justice reforms and anti-discrimination legislation, as well as a bill to increase the minimum wage. The House, on the other hand?

“Quite frankly, I’m disappointed – particularly in the House,” the governor said, with a sigh.


Sue Lincoln

So much social media and conventional media attention in the capital city has been focused on rumors about the Department of Justice release of the Alton Sterling report, late yesterday afternoon, I went to the person who requested the investigation—Governor John Bel Edwards – and asked him what he had heard about the imminent release of the report.


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“We’re trying to get away from having consistent midyear cuts, which, as of right now, the only way I can think of doing it is not appropriating all of the money,” House Appropriations chair Cameron Henry said, as he called for his committee to approve what he referred to as a “standstill” budget, spending just 97.5% of the revenue forecast for the next fiscal year.


Sculpting the Budget

May 1, 2017
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After several weeks of examining the material they have to work with, the House Appropriations Committee begins sculpting the budget bill today. It’s clear they intend to use their chisels now, rather than later.


Sue Lincoln

The second week of the session brought a kaleidoscope of activity to the Capitol, as color co-ordinated citizen activist groups and students sporting blue, yellow, red, green and/or purple  rallied on the steps and then cornered their lawmakers urging votes for equal pay, criminal justice reform, and mostly for more funding.