Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality

courtesy: LA DEQ

For years, it’s been joked that DEQ stands for “don’t even question,” since Louisiana allows its industrial plants to self-report hazardous releases.

 

"There’s some entities, if they have a release, they’ll say, ‘Well, nothing left the fence line,'" Dr. Chuck Carr Brown acknowledges.

 

Of course, that was before he became Secretary of Louisiana's Department of Environmental Quality last year.


The public comment period on the EPA settlement with Exxon is now open. The agreement involves reducing air pollutants at eight Exxon facilities — five in Texas and three in Baton Rouge.

 

"The company has agreed to install what we call 'flare gas recovery systems,'" the EPA's Patrick Foley explains. "These requirements will cost about $300 million to implement, but they’ll have significant reductions in air pollutants."


npr.org

All week we’ve been looking into Louisiana’s environmental quality, so what about the air that we breathe?

“Certain standards go above and beyond what EPA calls for. We’re moving in that direction,” DEQ Secretary Chuck Carr Brown told us.


Sue Lincoln

Louisiana has no comprehensive water policy, though DEQ Secretary Chuck Carr Brown believes it should.

“From a water use standpoint, I think there should be some overall plan that everybody contributes to,” Brown says.

But getting there? That’s the problem, as a bill debate during last spring’s legislative session pointed out.

LDEQ

The Department of Environmental Quality does attempt to educate law enforcement officials about environmental crimes.  Capitol Access’ Wallis Watkins recently attended one of their seminars.


courtesy: LA DEQ

For years, it’s been joked that D.E.Q. stands for “don’t even question”, since Louisiana allows its industrial plants to self-report hazardous releases.

“There’s some entities, if they have a release, they’ll say, ‘Well, nothing left the fence line’,” Dr. Chuck Carr Brown acknowledges.

Of course, that was before he became Secretary of Louisiana’s Department of Environmental Quality earlier this year.


Dr. Brian Salvatore

The House Committee on Natural Resources and Environment was packed on Wednesday as Representative Gene Reynolds (D-Minden) presented House Bill 11, which Reynolds filed "strictly to stop the open burn of munitions in the state of Louisiana.” 


Baton Rouge Air Quality Improving According to DEQ

Dec 14, 2015
Department of Environmental Quality

In early December, the Department of Environmental Quality released their annual report. Much of the report focused on air quality-- in particular, ozone.

"It’s the saying ozone’s good up high, bad nearby," says Vivian Aucoin, senior staff scientist at DEQ.

  

Did you know a piece of paper could kill? Natchitoches Rep. Kenny Cox found that out Wednesday, when the fiscal note for his HB 590 was delivered just a few minutes before its hearing in the House Natural Resources Committee.

Cox’s bill would require industrial plants to install air quality monitors along their fence lines.

“This bill is about safety: safety for the people who live along the fence lines,” Cox said in explanation of the proposed law.

Before too much testimony on the bill was given, Houma Rep. Joe Harrison advised Cox that the estimated state cost for implementing the bill – the fiscal note – was going to be the real issue.

Fifteen million pounds of deteriorating explosives are improperly stored at Camp Minden in northwest Louisiana. The company charged with disposing of them has gone bankrupt. The U.S. Army agreed to destroy the M6 propellant via open tray burning. Area residents said no.

Last week, lawmakers on the House Appropriations committee asked Department of Environmental Quality Secretary Peggy Hatch for an update.

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