Louisiana legislature

Sue Lincoln

Though the next full round of statewide elections is more than two years away, how do Governor John Bel Edwards’ chances for re-election look?

“I would say about 50-50,” pollster John Couvillon of JMC Analytics told the Baton Rouge Press Club Monday.

“Even though he has the benefits of incumbency, it’s also becoming very tough to be a Democrat in Louisiana.”

Overall, Couvillon believes Edwards “broke even” with voters during a difficult first year in office.

Sue Lincoln

Lawmakers head to Baton Rouge today, for the 6:30 p.m. convening of a special legislative session. As they do so, they might want to take note of the new University of New Orleans Survey Research poll, conducted last week.

“People are aware of what’s going on. They are paying attention,” UNO’s Dr. Ed Chervenak says of the statewide survey, which he supervised.

Recovery School District

It would seem logical: don’t build schools on dump sites.

“We have no law in Louisiana. Other states have it. This simply protects our children when someone proposes to build a school on a piece of land that is formerly used to dump stuff.”


Women's Place, Part 2

Aug 1, 2016
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(Until the 1974 state Constitution, women in Louisiana were legal “chattel”, i.e., property of their fathers or husbands. This is the second of a two-part series looking at “a woman’s place” in Louisiana, more than 40 years later.)

Last week, the New York Times and other media outlets said “Louisiana won the DNC roll call vote” – for enthusiasm.

Damon J. Baldone & Associates

When former state representative Damon Baldone walked into the Terrebonne Parish Registrar’s office on Monday, he didn’t think he was doing anything unprecedented. 


With so much current focus on the state budget, the term “statutory dedications” keeps coming up. What are they and why are they an issue? We turn to Louisiana Treasurer John Kennedy for answers.

“We have about 370 special accounts into which money automatically flows, because the Legislature has dedicated it,” Kennedy says, by way of introduction.

Former Louisiana State Senator Anthony "Tony" Guarisco, Jr. is our lead off guest and he stays with us for the first two segments of today's show. Tony served as State Senator from 1976-1988 and while in office he successfully sponsored a bill permitting physicians in Louisiana to prescribe medical marijuana for glaucoma and chemotherapy patients, which ultimately did not come to fruition. He and Jim discuss this, as well as other bills Tony pushed for while in office. They also talk taxes, partisanship in Washington, Edwin Edwards, and much more.

Tulane Professor, Author and New Orleans resident Katy Simpson Smith is with us today to promote her debut novel The Story of Land and Sea​. The novel follows three generations of family through the years following the American Revolution and how they come to find redemption amidst slavery and war. She talks with Jim about what she went through in writing her novel, her feeling of responsibility to represent the wide range of experiences women have had historically, and much more. She'll be at the Columns Hotel in New Orleans, La. on Wednesday September 3rd, 2014 at 7:00pm.


Journalist, political commentator and contributor to The Advocate Quinn Hillyer joins Jim for the first half of today's show. Quinn talks about running for political office in the past, President Obama's Affordable Care Act, and what it's like to be now writing for The Advocate. 

Founder and CEO of Pencils of Promise, and recent author of the critically acclaimed book The Promise of a Pencil: How an Ordinary Person Can Create Extraordinary Change, Adam Braun talks with Jim about his book and the work his non-profit organization is doing to make sure every child has access to quality education. To learn more about Adam's organization, visit www.pencilsofpromise.org.


  When legislators return from their four-day Easter recess this afternoon, the full House will take up a rather controversial bill—naming “the Holy Bible” as the official state book of Louisiana.

Not every bill a legislator files is to make new law. Sometimes a bill is needed to repeal an old law. Such was the case Tuesday in the House Criminal Justice committee.

“No matter what you might think about the language, it is unconstitutional,” said Baton Rouge Representative Pat Smith, in reference to the state’s sodomy law, also known as “crime against nature”, and her bill to repeal it.

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