What's the Best Way To Fix the LSU Lakes?

Oct 26, 2015
Travis Lux

The LSU lakes are sick. They’re slowly filling with harmful nutrients and sediment, without an effective way to drain.

“If we do nothing, they will become the swamps that they were,” says landscape architect Jeffrey Carbo. With funding provided by the Baton Rouge Area Foundation (BRAF), Carbo's firm, Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects, helped create the Lakes Master Plan.

Their solution is to dredge. But not everyone likes that plan.

All Over But the Voting

Oct 23, 2015

The final gubernatorial forum before tomorrow’s primary election was held Wednesday night at LSU. Most reports on the event zeroed in on David Vitter’s absence, coupled with Scott Angelle pointing to the videos posted last weekend by blogger Jason Brad Berry.

“I understand a serious sin,” Angelle said, after directing viewers to the website containing the videos. “It is now perhaps a lifestyle that we need to examine – a lifestyle that Louisiana cannot afford.”

LSU Genetics Lab Contributes to 1000 Genome Project

Oct 12, 2015

When you think "mutant," you probably think of Magneto from the X-Men. But if you ask Dr. Mark Batzer, a biology professor at LSU, he might start talking about Barbara McClintock, who discovered transposons in 1953. She won a Nobel Prize in Medicine for the discovery.

For the first time in months, LSU System President F. King Alexander was able to relax a bit over the weekend.

“I spent it with our daughter, at her soccer tournament Saturday and Sunday.”

Last Thursday, Louisiana’s full House passed some revenue raising bills, alleviating some of Alexander’s worry that no solution to the $1.6 billion budget deficit – and the crippling cuts looming over higher education – would be found. Today, the House Appropriations Committee is expected to add that additional funding into the budget bill, with the bulk going toward higher education.

Alexander says the situation appears brighter than before, but, “We’ve got a long ways to go. We’re not there yet.”

Dr. Isiah Warner on the campus of LSU.

The sciences are tough enough. For students of color, studying science, technology, engineering or math can be particularly daunting.

At LSU over the last decade and then some, Isiah Warner has been leading efforts to help those students make it from high school all the way through graduate school. And it seems to be working.

The graduation rate for African American undergrads who’ve gotten scholarships and mentorship through a program called La-STEM is 86 percent — by comparison, it was just 60 percent for the LSU campus overall among last spring’s cohort.

Warner is now Vice Chancellor of Strategic Initiatives and Boyd Professor of analytical and environmental chemistry.

As an African American growing up in Bunkie, his enthusiasm for science was unusual — to say the least.