Highland Coffees owner Clarke Cadzow is our guest for the better part of today's show and he joins us in studio to discuss the recent news that he'll be closing his doors come December 24th. Located at the North Gates of LSU campus, Highland Coffees has been a staple for students, the community, out-of-town visitors and LSU professors for 25 years. Clarke discusses what happened in the latest lease negotiation contracts between him and the property owner, and what the future will hold for Highland Coffees.

Also, Al Vernacchio, author of For Goodness Sex joins us to promote his book and discuss the way we should be talking to teens about sexuality. His book proposes a progressive and 21st century approach to sex ed for parents and teens which promotes a healthy outlook upon sexuality.

Former LSU Chancellor and now Chancellor of Colorado State University Mike Martin calls in to talk with Jim for the better part of today's show. Mike discusses his time at LSU, what he liked about Baton Rouge, what he didn't, and what some of the reasons were that factored into his decision to leave.

Dr. J. Edward Chamberlin talks with Jim about his recently published book Island: How Islands Transform the World. Out of the the 7 billion people on earth, 1 billion live on islands; and they shape our lives more than many people think.

 In honor of National Poetry Month, Ann Marie Awad sat down to talk with Ava Leavell Haymon, Louisiana’s Poet Laureate. She’s on a mission to change the way the rest of the world looks at the state of Louisiana through poetry. 


   The House Appropriations Committee got a different look at the cost of six years’ worth of higher education cuts Monday, as the push is on for colleges and universities to better prepare students to fill new jobs coming to Louisiana.

The First Bell series is a growing collection of stories from students, parents, and educators about pivotal experiences in education. To tell your story, email with "My First Bell" in the subject line or tweet with the hashtag #MyFirstBell.


Vasser was not a good student in 2005.

When Hurricane Katrina forced him to move out of New Orleans and transfer to Catholic High in Baton Rouge, he had to turn it around.