Mary Landrieu

Louisiana’s congressional delegation — most notably former U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu — has fought for coastal restoration funding for years. And it’s just about to pay off big.

“In November of 2017, approximately $170-million is to be made available to the state — $140-million of which comes to the CPRA,” explains Kyle Graham, with Louisiana’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority. The source of the funds is a federal program known as GOMESA.

After 18 years in office, Democratic Senator Mary Landrieu may lose her seat in tomorrow’s Louisiana runoff election. Landrieu is competing with Louisiana Congressman Bill Cassidy, who is predicted to win the race.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Sue Lincoln, reporter for WRKF in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, about the Senate runoff.

Ann Marie Awad

Ahead of the Dec. 6 runoff, we’ve invited each of the candidates for Congress in the 6th District and for Senate for an interview. 

Democratic incumbent Mary Landrieu was on the campaign trail — literally — driving from Shreveport to Baton Rouge — when WRKF’s Amy Jeffries reached her to talk about some of the big issues in the Senate race, starting with Obamacare.

With a battle cry of “Repeal Obamacare”, Republicans took control of the U.S. Senate earlier this month. Wrangling in Washington over when—or if—to actually act on that campaign promise is part of the backdrop to Louisiana’s Senate runoff.

Two bills that would authorize building the controversial Keystone XL pipeline will soon come to a vote in Congress, as their sponsors — Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., and Rep. Bill Cassidy, R-La. — head toward a runoff election next month to decide who will win the Senate race.

NPR's Debbie Elliott reports:

"On the Senate floor, Landrieu called for action on the Canada-to-Texas pipeline project, saying, 'I believe with a push we could actually get the votes that we need to pass the Keystone pipeline.'