Medicaid expansion

S. Lincoln

(This is an encore episode.)

As Louisiana deals with chronic shortages in the state healthcare budget and works through accepting the federal Medicaid expansion, a whole lot of acronyms are being tossed around, like ACA, IGTs, CMS, IAT, DSH payments, FMAP rates.

What the heck is all this alphabet soup, you ask? Here’s a quick class on Medicaid terminology.


First Order of Business

Jan 13, 2016
Sue Lincoln

As promised, Governor John Bel Edwards wasted no time, taking care of business the first day after his inauguration.

“Today I’m here to sign an executive order -- and as you might have imagined, it’s my first -- to expand health care to hundreds of thousands of Louisiana working families,” Edwards announced in his first official gubernatorial press conference Tuesday.

“What this means is that adults who make up to $16,242 a year as an individual, or up to $33,465 for a family of four, would be eligible for Medicaid coverage.”

Sue Lincoln

Governor-elect John Bel Edwards named more cabinet-level officials Tuesday, including Dr. Rebekah Gee to head the Department of Health and Hospitals. A physician and the current Medicaid Medical Director for the state, Gee says she’s aware of the challenges ahead.

“We have just fallen to 50th in the ranking of United Health rankings, the worst state in the nation,” she noted, adding, “We believe we can do better.”

She points to Medicaid expansion as the first step in a better direction.

creativecommons.org

As Louisiana deals with chronic shortages in the state healthcare budget and works through accepting the federal Medicaid expansion, a whole lot of acronyms are being tossed around, like ACA, IGTs, CMS, IAT, DSH payments, FMAP rates.

What the heck is all this alphabet soup, you ask? Here’s a quick class on Medicaid terminology.

First is “ACA”, which stands for the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

Then there’s “CMS”, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare services. That’s the federal administrative and rule-making authority for Medicaid.

healthcare.gov

“How many people would be eligible in Louisiana?” Senate Finance Committee chairman Jack Donahue asked state health officials Monday.

More than half a million was the response.

“We would say that’s probably worst-case scenario,” DHH Undersecretary Jeff Reynolds added.

But there was more, as the committee was reminded the federal government is reducing Louisiana’s total funding for indigent care, beginning in January 2018.

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