Medicaid expansion

Wallis Watkins

“Access to healthcare not only results in better individual outcomes.  It also helps to grow a productive workforce,” Governor John Bel Edwards told the Louisiana Health Summit, held Tuesday at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge.

He told health care stakeholders in attendance that with the state budget crisis, accepting Medicaid expansion makes fiscal sense.

“This Medicaid expansion is more important today because of that shortfall and because of the challenges around our safety-net system, than it would have been otherwise.”

United States House of Representatives

Four Republicans and one Democrat have announced their candidacy for the United States Senate seat currently held by David Vitter. One of those Republicans is Representative Charles Boustany of Louisiana’s Third Congressional district. 

S. Lincoln

(This is an encore episode.)

As Louisiana deals with chronic shortages in the state healthcare budget and works through accepting the federal Medicaid expansion, a whole lot of acronyms are being tossed around, like ACA, IGTs, CMS, IAT, DSH payments, FMAP rates.

What the heck is all this alphabet soup, you ask? Here’s a quick class on Medicaid terminology.

First Order of Business

Jan 13, 2016
Sue Lincoln

As promised, Governor John Bel Edwards wasted no time, taking care of business the first day after his inauguration.

“Today I’m here to sign an executive order -- and as you might have imagined, it’s my first -- to expand health care to hundreds of thousands of Louisiana working families,” Edwards announced in his first official gubernatorial press conference Tuesday.

“What this means is that adults who make up to $16,242 a year as an individual, or up to $33,465 for a family of four, would be eligible for Medicaid coverage.”

Sue Lincoln

Governor-elect John Bel Edwards named more cabinet-level officials Tuesday, including Dr. Rebekah Gee to head the Department of Health and Hospitals. A physician and the current Medicaid Medical Director for the state, Gee says she’s aware of the challenges ahead.

“We have just fallen to 50th in the ranking of United Health rankings, the worst state in the nation,” she noted, adding, “We believe we can do better.”

She points to Medicaid expansion as the first step in a better direction.