Medicaid

Jim talks with LSU Latin American Studies professor Stephen Andes, about Pope Francis I, the first South American pontiff, and the first from the western hemisphere.

Jan Moller, director of the Louisiana Budget Project, talks about the 62nd annual Gridiron show this weekend, which skewers local politics and events. Jan is joined by Sophia Kunen and Michael Stagg, with Forward Louisiana, to talk about Governor Jindal's tax reform proposal and why Louisiana should accept the Medicaid expansion that's part of the federal health care reforms.

Buddhist monk Anam Thubten discusses the recent rash of self-immolations among monks and holy men in his home country. He''ll speak locally this weekend at the Agame Meditation Center on Acadian.


Former state Rep. Melissa Flournoy and former Health Secretary David Hood, who disagree with Gov. Jindal on the Medicaid Expansion.

Pulitzer Prize winning composer David Lang, who'll perform at LSU tonight with the Wind Ensemble.

A visit with satirist Roy Zimmerman, who'll appear tonight at the Unitarian Church.

Baton Rouge Bishop Robert Muench talks about the new pontiff, Pope Francis I.

WRKF

The state legislature’s Joint Insurance Committee met Wednesday to discuss the Affordable Care Act and two crucial, yet voluntary, measures: setting up state health insurance exchanges and expanding Medicaid.

At that meeting a representative from the Public Affairs Research Council said Louisiana doesn’t have enough information to make a truly informed decision on implementing the healthcare reform law.

PAR’s Principle Health Advisor Don Gregory recently authored a study about the research done so far on the implications of expanding Medicaid in Louisiana. He says other states have worked to figure out not just the costs, but also the benefits of insuring the uninsured.


Gov. Bobby Jindal still opposes Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act, despite the federal government having recently approved some  flexibility on the issue.

Gov. Bobby Jindal has remained steadfast thus far in his opposition to expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act saying it’s too expensive and that Medicaid is an outdated, inflexible program. 

Not expanding Medicaid it will have a direct effect on low-to-moderate income New Orleanians.

Dept. of Health and Hospitals

Almost $83 million in cuts to healthcare programs and services went into effect Friday to shore up a mid-year deficit in the state budget. These are separate from a previous round of cuts made in July.

The latest round of reductions includes cuts to services for at-risk children and low-income moms, as well as a one percent drop in the rate paid to hospitals and physicians for non-primary Medicaid services. 


Nearly $52 million in state cuts to Medicaid services go into effect Friday, Feb. 1. The reductions are part of the Dept. of Health and Hospitals’ response to a mid-year shortfall in Louisiana’s general fund.

The cuts include the elimination of dental benefits for pregnant women and a healthy parenting program for first-time mothers who qualify for Medicaid. Additionally, the rate paid to hospitals and physicians for non-primary care services through Medicaid will be dropped by 1 percent.

Jindal, who is chairman of the Republican Governors Association, wrote to the president Thursday after a request from the Louisiana governor and 10 others went unanswered.

Republican governors, including Jindal, want flexibility on expanded eligibility criteria for Medicaid recipients, according to The Hill.

Top Jindal administration officers used personal email accounts to come up with a media strategy around cuts to Medicaid.

LSU Mass Communications Professor Craig Freeman says the new revelations point to a need for Louisiana to update its public records laws.

"We haven’t really, effectively updated public records laws in probably 30 years. But we’re essentially using a 1960’s remedy for a new millennium problem," Freeman said.

Ballot Amendment would Restrict Medicaid Fund Use

Nov 5, 2012

The first of nine constitutional amendments on the ballot in Louisiana would prevent the legislature from raiding the state’s Medicaid Trust Fund to balance the budget. But LSU Political Scientist Robert Hogan says it could also hamstring the budgeting process if Louisiana’s demographics shift. 

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