NCAA

Sports
5:35 am
Fri August 15, 2014

More Money for Student Athletes May Not Mean More for Education

Credit JustDog / Wikimedia

College football season is upon us. The first regular season game for the LSU Tigers is in two weeks. Playoffs debut this year. And the Tigers will have a new starting quarterback. There are major shifts happening off the field for Division I programs too.

Brad Wolverton is a reporter with the Chronicle of Higher Education in Washington D.C. and has been following the NCAA action.


Sports
1:48 pm
Thu August 7, 2014

NCAA Votes To Give New Autonomy To Big Conferences

Kansas State University President Kirk Schulz (left) discusses the NCAA structure Thursday, as Wright State University President David R. Hopkins looks on. The NCAA Board of Directors approved a package of historic reforms Thursday that will give the nation's five biggest conferences the ability to unilaterally change some of the basic rules governing college sports.
Michael Conroy AP

Elite college sports conferences can set their own rules about sharing profits with student-athletes and other matters, under a new policy adopted by the NCAA's Division I Board of Directors on Thursday.

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Sports
11:39 am
Thu August 7, 2014

NCAA Vote Could Boost Student-Athletes' Benefits, Big Schools' Power

NCAA President Mark Emmert answers a question at an April 6 news conference in Arlington, Texas.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 11:46 am

Major college sports programs could take a significant step today toward sharing their wealth with the student-athletes whose performances help line their coffers.

The NCAA Board of Directors is expected to vote this afternoon on a plan to restructure Division I athletics, which would give the five biggest athletic conferences autonomy in making certain rules and provide so-called enhanced benefits to student-athletes.

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Sports
2:28 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Deford: NCAA Says Amateurism Is Alive And Well, But The Jig Is Up

Wisconsin's Traevon Jackson at practice for the 2014 NCAA men's college basketball tournament. Commentator Frank Deford says that, despite NCAA claims to the contrary, most college players are not typical students — "their job is to play a sport."
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 11:48 am

Amateurism is dead, revealed so in the trial against the NCAA now in progress in Oakland, Calif., U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken presiding. Before her skeptical eyes, amateurism has been laid out naked on a courtroom slab for a jury of all fans to see that it has no beating heart.

Amateurism, Judge Wilken has been told in the case, commonly known as the O'Bannon trial, nobly protects college athletes from being exploited by evil outsiders — so the NCAA knighthood was created in order that colleges could tie up athletes all by themselves.

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Sports
3:53 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

NCAA Directors Decide To Allow More Freedom To Wealthier Schools

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 6:17 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Today, the NCAA announced what could be major changes in the way it operates. Among those potential changes, more autonomy for the five wealthiest Division 1 conferences and more benefits for student athletes. The board of directors endorsed the moves today at their headquarters in Indianapolis. Final approval could come in August, when the board meets next.

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Sports
4:37 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Would March Be Less Mad If Players Were Paid?

Arizona guard Gabe York (1) pulls down a rebound as teammate Rondae Hollis-Jefferson (23) watches during a regional semifinal NCAA college basketball tournament game against San Diego State, Thursday in Anaheim, Calif.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 9:44 am

Would March Madness be terribly different if the players were paid?

Probably not. The college basketball tournament might become more professionalized, but it wouldn't look much different from what we're seeing right now.

"I don't see it changing one iota," says ESPN basketball analyst Jay Bilas.

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