New Orleans

New Orleans is known for its enormous Vietnamese population, one of the largest in the country. But we recently came across a story about a now-lost Chinatown in New Orleans — two of them, in fact — and how they came to be. To understand how these hubs came about, and why they disappeared, we have to rewind the clock 150 years, to the end of the Civil War.

Photographer Richard Sexton joins Jim for the better part of today's show to discuss his life, his photographs, and his book Creole World: Photographs of New Orleans and the Latin Caribbean Sphere. The book is a complex, multi-layered essay linking New Orleans, which is frequently referred to as the northernmost Caribbean city, with its cultural kin further to the south. The similarities, which he finds in the book through photographs, are quite striking and at times uncanny.

Author Aaron James joins Jim to close out today's show, and he talks with Jim about his book "A**holes: A Theory." He explains why a**holes are the way they are, and why the majority of them are men.

Daughts of Charity Serivces

After Charity Hospital in New Orleans closed in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, community clinics filled the gap in care for the poor and uninsured.

If you find yourself craving New Orleans food, you could go there and melt in the sweltering heat for a dose of gumbo or praline bacon. Or you could settle in on your couch, as I've been doing, and torture yourself watching reruns of the HBO series Treme. It's set in post-Katrina New Orleans and, along with the music, it puts the city's food on center stage.

Gov. Bobby Jindal has remained steadfast thus far in his opposition to expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act saying it’s too expensive and that Medicaid is an outdated, inflexible program. 

Not expanding Medicaid it will have a direct effect on low-to-moderate income New Orleanians.