New Orleans

The controversy continues over actors who were paid to attend public meetings and speak in support of a new Entergy power plant in New Orleans East.

Former Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe on the state of the Democratic Party in the South and his appearance at the True Blue Gala for Louisiana Democrats next week. Malcolm Suber of Take ‘Em Down Nola on his quest to have more monuments removed in New Orleans. Baton Rouge gardening icon Walter Imahara on his profession and his days as a young man in a Japanese Internment Camp.

Pictured: Walter Imahara 


It’s Mitch Landrieu’s last week as mayor. Latoya Cantrell takes the office on Monday.

Landrieu came into office eight years ago facing a huge budget deficit and the challenge of rebuilding after Hurricane Katrina. In the past year he’s drawn national attention for removing confederate monuments and publishing a book about the experience.

A New Orleans judicial watchdog group says bail is being set unevenly in Orleans Parish, resulting in dangerous criminals being released while nonviolent offenders get stuck in jail.  

The Trump Administration has deported almost 85,000 people for about half of this year.

In New Orleans, many immigrants are worried about their future. Hundreds held a candlelight vigil last night to protest deportations.  

Tuesday marks 12 years since Hurricane Katrina smashed into New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, bringing destruction and taking more than 1,500 lives in Louisiana alone. Communities in the Ninth Ward had planned to mark the day with a second line Tuesday morning, but rain from Tropical Storm Harvey forced them to postpone the event.

Gov. John Bel Edwards toured flood damage in New Orleans Monday. Edwards and Mayor Mitch Landrieu spoke to business owners and residents in the Treme where cleanup is underway.

Windell Bean’s family has owned their home on St. Ann for 53 years. Other than Katrina, the house hasn’t flooded since 1978. That is until Saturday, when it took on 4 inches of water.

Sarah Cannon helps her New Orleans students prepare for a debate about felon disenfranchisement.Credit Mallory Falk/WWNOEdit | Remove

By Mallory Falk, WWNO

Civil Rights. Voter ID Laws. Felon Rights. These topics aren’t foreign for teachers and students in Southern classrooms. But what happens when pressure to teach to the test prevents challenging conversations?

New Orleans is known for its enormous Vietnamese population, one of the largest in the country. But we recently came across a story about a now-lost Chinatown in New Orleans — two of them, in fact — and how they came to be. To understand how these hubs came about, and why they disappeared, we have to rewind the clock 150 years, to the end of the Civil War.

Photographer Richard Sexton joins Jim for the better part of today's show to discuss his life, his photographs, and his book Creole World: Photographs of New Orleans and the Latin Caribbean Sphere. The book is a complex, multi-layered essay linking New Orleans, which is frequently referred to as the northernmost Caribbean city, with its cultural kin further to the south. The similarities, which he finds in the book through photographs, are quite striking and at times uncanny.

Author Aaron James joins Jim to close out today's show, and he talks with Jim about his book "A**holes: A Theory." He explains why a**holes are the way they are, and why the majority of them are men.


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