Politics

Coverage of politics from the Louisiana statehouse in Baton Rouge and beyond.

Louisiana's new abortion law requires doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges to a nearby hospital. But a lawsuit challenged the law on the basis that the requirement was medically unnecessary and would result in the closure of the state's abortion clinics. A federal judge on Sunday temporarily blocked the measure.

Sue Lincoln

Embattled Congressman Vance McAllister  made quite a splash when he appeared at the Secretary of State’s office first thing Friday, signing up to run again.  Even after facing down calls for his resignation earlier this year McAllister was quite gracious about the nine challengers seeking to unseat him.

“C’mon! More! The more the merrier!” McAllister said, adding by way of explanation, “When you have more ideas, more people, more views, you learn from it.”

 

Candidates for office, from Constable to Senate, have been parading through the Secretary of State’s Office and the Clerk of Court Office this week, qualifying to get their names on the November ballot.

But it’s not just names that we’ll be voting on.

Robert Travis Scott, President of the Public Affairs Research Council of Louisiana, explains why we’ve got so many constitutional amendments to decide on too.

 


U.S. House Majority Whip Steve Scalise qualified for the 1st congressional district race Thursday, seeking his 4th term representing the New Orleans area. The state’s first congress member to hold the leadership post since Hale Boggs in 1971, Scalise says he’s now positioned to do more in Washington for his home state.

Louisiana’s 5th District ballot is filling up, with five contenders signed on to challenge embattled incumbent Vance McAllister. Zach Dasher, the nephew of “Duck Dynasty” patriarch Phil Robertson, qualified for the race Thursday.

Candidates for U.S. Congress inundated the Louisiana Secretary of State’s office first thing Wednesday, as the three-day qualifying period for the Nov. 4 election opened. The frontrunners for U.S. Senate didn’t hesitate to start brandishing their swords in the war of campaign words.

Mercedes Ricks may be the perfect candidate to help launch a new cultural push in Magnolia, Miss. The 50-year-old native of Colombia ended up in this tiny south Mississippi town by way of New Orleans nine years ago.

"I met these ladies from here," Ricks says after greeting guests in the barroom next to her Mariposa restaurant. "They invited me to come spend a weekend in Magnolia. We were going to go to the river and drink beer, and Katrina happened that weekend."

The Baton Rouge Metro Council picked up where they left off at the last meeting in July and took a vote Wednesday on the so-called “fairness ordinance”. The anti-discrimination measure failed on an 8-4 vote. 


A new law that could close every abortion clinic in south Louisiana goes into effect in less than three weeks, on Sept. 1. Clinics in Baton Rouge and New Orleans are fighting to stay open. 


Sen. Lamar Alexander easily dispatched rival Republican Joe Carr in the Tennessee primary Thursday, completing a clean sweep for this year's Senate incumbents who faced intraparty challengers claiming the Tea Party label.

Yet while they were winless, the hard-core conservatives intent on selecting a Senate more to their liking this year were far from utterly defeated. All of the challenged GOP incumbents reacted to the pressure by working to reconfirm their credentials with conservatives. This held true even for those whose credentials should have been least in doubt.

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