Politics

Politics
5:49 am
Mon December 9, 2013

Will Obamacare Play Big In 2014? Keep An Eye On N.H. Senate Race

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., on Capitol Hill earlier this year.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon December 9, 2013 10:54 am

With a new White House push to promote the Affordable Care Act well underway, the question is whether an improved HealthCare.gov site and onslaught of positive talking points will be enough to bolster Senate Democrats facing tough races in 2014.

One re-election fight to watch is Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen's in New Hampshire, where she's been taking heat for supporting the new health care law.

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Politics
7:05 am
Sat December 7, 2013

Social Security Fight Exposes Democratic Divide On Populism

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Massachusetts Democrat, is leading a push to increase Social Security benefits. But her whole party is not in agreement on the issue.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Sat December 7, 2013 12:51 pm

American politics is having a populist moment, with voters angry and frustrated with all big institutions in American life.

The backlash against big government found its expression on the right with the Tea Party. The tensions between that movement and the Republican establishment have been on full display.

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Politics
1:57 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

Sen. Thad Cochran To Seek Re-Election In Mississippi

Sen. Thad Cochran, R-Miss., at a Senate Appropriations Committee hearing on June 12.
Charles Dharapak AP

Get ready for a bruising GOP primary battle in Mississippi.

Sen. Thad Cochran, R-Miss., said Friday he will seek a seventh term in 2014, setting the stage for a contentious contest that pits the Republican establishment against the Tea Party wing.

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Politics
4:03 am
Wed December 4, 2013

Loophole Or Workaround? (Food Stamp Edition)

Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 4, 2013 2:39 pm

In the debate over whether to cut the food stamp program, members of Congress are looking at two pretty arcane provisions in the law. People who want to cut food stamps call the provisions loopholes. People who don't want to cut food stamps say they're efficient ways to get benefits to those who need them most.

1. Categorical Eligibility

People who qualify for one means-tested program — like welfare — can automatically qualify for other programs — like food stamps. This is called "categorical eligibility."

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Politics
5:37 am
Tue December 3, 2013

How 2013 Became The Greatest Year In Gay Rights History

Several same-sex couples hold a group wedding ceremony Monday at the Sheraton Waikiki in Honolulu.
Marco Garcia AP

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 7:59 am

Any day now, the New Mexico Supreme Court may grant same-sex couples the right to get married.

At this point, such a ruling may not seem like such a big deal. Prior to last year's elections, gays and lesbians had a civil right to marry in only six states. Now, they have it in 16.

"This year represented the true tipping point," says Eric Marcus, author of Making Gay History. "We've reached a moment in history where it's very difficult, if not impossible, to go back."

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Politics
2:55 pm
Sun December 1, 2013

5 Most Memorable Political Ads Of 2013

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Politics
5:12 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Rev. T.J. Jemison Remembered As Civil Rights Movement Pioneer

The Rev. T.J. Jemison escorts Mary Briscoe (left) and Sandra Ann Jones from jail in Baton Rouge, La., on April 4, 1960. The two had been in jail as a result of lunch counter sit-ins.
AP

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 6:21 pm

The state of Louisiana is paying tribute Friday to the Rev. T.J. Jemison, a strong and steady voice against unequal treatment for blacks in the Jim Crow South.

Jemison's body lay in repose at the Louisiana State Capitol in Baton Rouge, where Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., said he will be remembered as one of the greats of the civil rights movement.

"He had such a heart and courage for justice," Landrieu said. "There are very few people in our state that will rise to that level of influence, and it is very appropriate that our Capitol was opened up for him today."

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Politics
4:53 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

Will New Congressman Make a Mark with Pragmatism?

Vance McAllister took the oath of office Thursday, assuming the seat representing north Louisiana in Congress.

McAllister, a political newcomer, ran as a pragmatist and was not expected to win the 5th District seat.

State Sen. Neil Riser, a known quantity in Louisiana’s GOP,  had launched his campaign almost as soon as Rep. Rodney Alexander stepped down to take a job in Gov. Bobby Jindal’s cabinet last summer.

And, as Associated Press capitol correspondent Melinda Deslatte discusses with WRKF’s Amy Jeffries, Riser had been the obvious front-runner.

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Politics
5:54 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Political Rookie Pulls Off Surprise Win In Louisiana

Vance McAllister, shown in a photo provided by his campaign, will be the next representative from Louisiana's 5th Congressional District after winning Saturday's special election.
AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 7:11 pm

Republicans are still trying to make sense of Saturday's election results in Louisiana.

In an upset, GOP political newcomer Vance McAllister handily defeated fellow Republican Neil Riser Saturday in a special election runoff that tested the party's approach toward Obamacare.

Riser had the backing of the Republican establishment and Tea Party groups. McAllister was buoyed by endorsements from two local African-American leaders and the family featured in the popular reality television series Duck Dynasty.

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Politics
3:23 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Study: Commuting Adversely Affects Political Engagement

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 11:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Okay. We all know about the partisan divide in this country - Democrats, Republicans - but there's another political divide. Part of the country is very engaged in the political process and part is not.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Older Americans, richer Americans and better educated Americans are more likely to be politically engaged. Now researchers have found one more factor that seems to shape political engagement, the length of your commute. It comes to our attention as MORNING EDITION focuses on commuting.

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