pruning

LSU AgCenter

Early February is an excellent time to prune repeat flowering roses. And now is the time to get this done if you haven't pruned them already.

Repeat flowering roses are those that bloom heavily in the spring and early summer, then intermittently through the summer, and heavy blooming again in October through early to mid December.

Roses are pruned for a variety of reasons. One of them is to stimulate new growth. Another reason is to control the size of the bush.


LSU AgCenter

Virtually all trees in our landscapes will need to be pruned during their lives, particularly in the first two decades after planting.

Sometimes a tree may be pruned in some way to help it, such as in dealing with storm damage, reducing limb weight, removing dead limbs, and stopping the spread of diseases. More often trees are pruned to adapt them to our urban environments, including keeping limbs from coming into contact with power lines, rubbing against the home, hanging too low, or obstructing views.

Home gardeners can carry out minor pruning, especially to train younger trees before they get large. Ask yourself why you think the tree needs to be pruned.


LSU AgCenter

For gardeners tired of the heat and longing for cooler weather, September can provide welcome relief. Cool fronts often begin to make their way this far south in September, but days in the 90s are not uncommon this month. And after a long, hot summer, these long, scorching days are especially hard to bear for gardeners and their landscapes.

LSU AgCenter

Are your roses looking pretty pathetic right now? Heat takes its toll on plants and people alike during the summer here in Baton Rouge. But effort made now will ensure a beautiful rose blooming season in through October, November, and early December.


Mark Claesgens

Rose bushes generally don't look their best this time of year.

Heat takes its toll.   

  

Apricot Drift rose.
Allen Owings

Most roses are not especially happy in the extreme heat of mid-to-late summer. And, come to think of it, neither are most gardeners. But pruning some roses is something you might want to consider this time of year. 


Drift Apricot rose blossom
LSU AgCenter

Early February is an excellent time to prune repeat-flowering roses.


Ice on Baton Rouge blooms, Jan. 24, 2014.
arubyan / Instagram

The Baton Rouge area, like most of Louisiana, has experienced a colder than average winter. Severe freezes in January have caused extensive damage to tropicals, citrus trees, and palms in the landscape.


A banana plant growing in Baton Rouge's Spanish Town.
Matthew Levine / Flickr

So far, this has been a relatively mild winter, as a result many of the tropical plants in our landscape get really big by July.


Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteers demonstrate proper pruning techniques.
Sharon Dowdy / University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Communications and Technology Services

Winter is a great time of year to evaluate shrubs, trees, hedges, and foundation plantings for any needed pruning. But for spring-flowering plants, it's best to wait.