pruning

Mark Claesgens

Rose bushes generally don't look their best this time of year.

Heat takes its toll.   

  

Apricot Drift rose.
Allen Owings

Most roses are not especially happy in the extreme heat of mid-to-late summer. And, come to think of it, neither are most gardeners. But pruning some roses is something you might want to consider this time of year. 


Drift Apricot rose blossom
LSU AgCenter

Early February is an excellent time to prune repeat-flowering roses.


Ice on Baton Rouge blooms, Jan. 24, 2014.
arubyan / Instagram

The Baton Rouge area, like most of Louisiana, has experienced a colder than average winter. Severe freezes in January have caused extensive damage to tropicals, citrus trees, and palms in the landscape.


A banana plant growing in Baton Rouge's Spanish Town.
Matthew Levine / Flickr

So far, this has been a relatively mild winter, as a result many of the tropical plants in our landscape get really big by July.


Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteers demonstrate proper pruning techniques.
Sharon Dowdy / University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Communications and Technology Services

Winter is a great time of year to evaluate shrubs, trees, hedges, and foundation plantings for any needed pruning. But for spring-flowering plants, it's best to wait.