Public Service Commission

Sue Lincoln

Should Louisiana allow utility companies to compete? That’s one of the questions posed to Public Service Commission candidates at a forum Tuesday.

Wallis Watkins

Sunday morning, August 14th, you awaken to find water rising in your home. You reach for your cell phone to call for help and – no service.

“You can’t get help. You’re looking for family members. You have to find a place to stay. You need transportation, and on, and on, and on,” Public Service Commissioner Lambert Boissiere recounted during Wednesday’s PSC meeting.

S. Lincoln

State lawmakers and gubernatorial candidates talked a lot about solar energy credits this past year, and now the Louisiana Public Service Commission is wrangling with solar energy issues of its own.

“Should people who have solar power on their homes, when they produce electricity and they maybe produce more than they need, should they be able to sell that at full retail price?” Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell sums up the current controversy.

Sue Lincoln

There has been plenty of rain, wind, lightning and thunder this summer, followed by numerous power outages. That’s led to more than a few complaints to the Louisiana Public Service Commission.

“’There were eight outages from Tuesday through Sunday of last week’,” PSC member Scott Angelle read from a stack of messages, during Wednesday’s meeting.  “He just feels there were too many to just write off as due to ‘weather-related’ issues.”

Jim chats with the always outspoken Foster Campbell, of the Louisiana Public Service Commission about Governor Jindal's recent Politico Op-Ed piece and an upcoming vote in the PSC on solar energy.

Former business executive Drew Boyd discusses his book, "Inside The Box" 

Regulators Cut Rate for Calls from Prison

Dec 12, 2012

The Louisiana Public Service Commission voted to roll back the rate charged to inmates by about 25 percent. With an amendment made Wednesday, the lowered rate only applies to calls to family members, clergy, legal counsel, and some government entities, including schools. The charge for calls will drop when existing prison phone service contracts end or in two years.

The five commissioners approved the rate change without objection after an unusually lengthy and at times tense debate.

Public Service Commission chairman Foster Campbell says the current system for prison inmate phone service is a scam run by greedy individuals. Campbell also shares his thoughts on Tuesday's election and Louisiana's congressional delegates.

New York Times sportswriter Ray Glier talks Saturday's LSU-Alabama matchup, a rematch of January's BCS title game.


The two best-funded candidates for a slot on the Public Service Commission are defending their acceptance of campaign money from the companies they would regulate.